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Research in organizational evolution. What comes next?

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  • Abatecola, Gianpaolo

Abstract

The literature about organizational evolution has been witnessing a tremendous amount of and continuous development among strategists since the second half of the 20th century and this critical review article aims to provide readers with a thorough discussion of past and contemporary research within this area. From the beginning, the article works through analogies with biology in attempting to trace the current boundaries of the field, with much of the review’s content thus structured around the proposed conceptual (and methodological) framework. In addressing the question of what forces drive organizational evolution, the article then takes on a middle ground by mainly focusing on the development of the dialectical and co-evolutionary approaches. It ends by prospecting what can come next for evolutionary (and co-evolutionary) research in the strategic management field.

Suggested Citation

  • Abatecola, Gianpaolo, 2014. "Research in organizational evolution. What comes next?," European Management Journal, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 434-443.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eurman:v:32:y:2014:i:3:p:434-443
    DOI: 10.1016/j.emj.2013.07.008
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    Cited by:

    1. Dermot Breslin, 2016. "What evolves in organizational co-evolution?," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 20(1), pages 45-67, March.
    2. Colin Jones, 2016. "An autecological interpretation of the firm and its environment," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 20(1), pages 69-87, March.
    3. Ewa Stańczyk-Hugiet & Janusz Strużyna & Katarzyna Piórkowska & Sylwia Stańczyk, 2016. "Space and Species. Business School Exemplifications," International Journal of Social Science Research, Macrothink Institute, vol. 4(1), pages 26-43, March.
    4. Jasper Grashuis, 2018. "An Exploratory Study of Cooperative Survival: Strategic Adaptation to External Developments," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(3), pages 1-15, February.
    5. Rocco Frondizi & Chiara Fantauzzi & Nathalie Colasanti & Gloria Fiorani, 2019. "The Evaluation of Universities’ Third Mission and Intellectual Capital: Theoretical Analysis and Application to Italy," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(12), pages 1-23, June.
    6. Roberto Cafferata, 2016. "Darwinist connections between the systemness of social organizations and their evolution," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 20(1), pages 19-44, March.
    7. Kiruba Nagini R. & S. Uma Devi & Sayed Mohamed, 2020. "A Proposal on Developing a 360° Agile Organizational Structure by Superimposing Matrix Organizational Structure with Cross-functional Teams," Management and Labour Studies, XLRI Jamshedpur, School of Business Management & Human Resources, vol. 45(3), pages 270-294, August.
    8. Paola M. A. Paniccia & Silvia Baiocco, 2018. "Co-Evolution of the University Technology Transfer: Towards a Sustainability-Oriented Industry: Evidence from Italy," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(12), pages 1-29, December.
    9. Richard J. Arend, 2020. "Getting Nothing from Something: Unfulfilled Promises of Current Dominant Approaches to Entrepreneurial Decision-Making," Administrative Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(3), pages 1-22, August.
    10. Chang, Rui-Dong & Zuo, Jian & Zhao, Zhen-Yu & Zillante, George & Gan, Xiao-Long & Soebarto, Veronica, 2017. "Evolving theories of sustainability and firms: History, future directions and implications for renewable energy research," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 48-56.
    11. Gianpaolo Abatecola & Fiorenza Belussi & Dermot Breslin & Igor Filatotchev, 2016. "Darwinism, organizational evolution and survival: key challenges for future research," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 20(1), pages 1-17, March.

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