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“Generalized Darwinism” and the quest for an evolutionary theory of policy-making

  • Christian Schubert

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    According to the “Generalized Darwinism” movement (GD), the three principles of variation, selection and retention/replication (labeled “Darwinian” in some variants of GD) can and should be used as a meta-theoretical framework for the explanation of evolutionary processes in the sociocultural domain. Despite their biological origins, the various variants of GD aim at redefining these principles in a way that is supposed to abstract from any domain-specific particulars. We argue that in order to qualify as an adequate meta-theoretical framework for evolutionary economics, GD should not only inspire and guide positive theory development in evolutionary economics, but also be able to support viable practical policy implications. Examining its potential to do so, however, leads us to the conclusion that in its specific deductive variant proposed by Hodgson & Knudsen (HKGD), it risks systematically misguiding evolutionary policy advice. Competing variants, such as the one proposed by Pelikan, fare better in this regard. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Evolutionary Economics.

    Volume (Year): 24 (2014)
    Issue (Month): 3 (July)
    Pages: 479-513

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:24:y:2014:i:3:p:479-513
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