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Evolvability and progress in evolutionary economics

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  • Tim Cochrane
  • James Maclaurin

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Tim Cochrane & James Maclaurin, 2012. "Evolvability and progress in evolutionary economics," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 101-114, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbioec:v:14:y:2012:i:2:p:101-114
    DOI: 10.1007/s10818-011-9116-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William Kingston, 2006. "Schumpeter, Business Cycles and Co-evolution," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 97-106.
    2. Geoffrey Hodgson & Thorbjørn Knudsen, 2006. "The nature and units of social selection," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 16(5), pages 477-489, December.
    3. Metcalfe, J S, 2001. "Institutions and Progress," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 561-586, September.
    4. Arthur, W Brian, 1989. "Competing Technologies, Increasing Returns, and Lock-In by Historical Events," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(394), pages 116-131, March.
    5. Dosi, Giovanni & Nelson, Richard R, 1994. "An Introduction to Evolutionary Theories in Economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 153-172, September.
    6. Gowdy, John, 1997. "Introduction: biology and economics," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 377-383, October.
    7. David, Paul A, 1985. "Clio and the Economics of QWERTY," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 332-337, May.
    8. J. Stan Metcalfe & John Foster & Ronnie Ramlogan, 2006. "Adaptive economic growth," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(1), pages 7-32, January.
    9. Arthur J. Robson, 2005. "Complex Evolutionary Systems and the Red Queen," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(504), pages 211-224, June.
    10. Witt, Ulrich, 1996. "Innovations, Externalities and the Problem of Economic Progress," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 89(1-2), pages 113-130, October.
    11. Boulding, K E, 1991. "What Is Evolutionary Economics?," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 9-17, January.
    12. Liebowitz, S J & Margolis, Stephen E, 1990. "The Fable of the Keys," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(1), pages 1-25, April.
    13. Sheri M. Markose, 2005. "Computability and Evolutionary Complexity: Markets as Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS)," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(504), pages 159-192, June.
    14. William Baumol, 2004. "Red-Queen games: arms races, rule of law and market economies," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 237-247, June.
    15. Jeroen Bergh, 2007. "Evolutionary thinking in environmental economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 17(5), pages 521-549, October.
    16. Daniel W. McShea, 1996. "Metazoan Complexity and Evolution: Is There a Trend?," Working Papers 96-01-002, Santa Fe Institute.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Schubert, 2013. "The pitfalls of Darwinian “progress”. A comment on “Evolvability and progress in evolutionary economics” by Tim Cochrane and James Maclaurin," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 325-328, October.
    2. Christian Schubert, 2014. "“Generalized Darwinism” and the quest for an evolutionary theory of policy-making," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 479-513, July.
    3. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2015. "Towards a Developmental Turn in Evolutionary Economic Geography?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(5), pages 712-732, May.
    4. Tim Cochrane & James Maclaurin, 2013. "The purpose of progress: A response to Schubert," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 329-331, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Progress; Evolvability; Modularity; Entrenchment; Change; B25; B52;

    JEL classification:

    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary

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