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There are several ways to incorporate evolutionary concepts into economic thinking

Listed author(s):
  • Christian Cordes

    (University of Bremen)

This article reviews the most important transfers of this kind into evolutionary economics. It broadly differentiates between approaches that draw on an analogy construction to the biological sphere, those that make metaphorical use of Darwinian ideas, and avenues that are based on the fact that other forms of – cultural – evolution rest upon foundations laid before by natural selection. It is shown that an evolutionary approach within economics informed by insights from cognitive science, evolutionary biology, and anthropology contributes to more realistic models of human behavior in economic contexts.

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File URL: ftp://137.248.191.199/RePEc/esi/discussionpapers/2014-02.pdf
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Paper provided by Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography in its series Papers on Economics and Evolution with number 2014-02.

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Length: 14 pages
Date of creation: 02 Sep 2014
Handle: RePEc:esi:evopap:2014-02
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Deutschhausstrasse 10, 35032 Marburg

Phone: 064212824257
Fax: 064212828950
Web page: http://www.uni-marburg.de/fb19/
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