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The historical development of the consumption of sweeteners - a learning approach

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  • Wilhelm Ruprecht

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Abstract

From a theoretical point of view, addressing the adoption of novelty and change in consumption is a topic of major interest since it challenges the axiomatic foundations of modern microeconomics. Starting from the “continuity hypothesis” which considers the evolution of culture to be based on biological evolution, an evolutionary approach is presented which highlights the role of consumer learning. By means of a case study on the complex consumption history of sweeteners, it is shown that this approach complements the Lancasterian characteristics approach to the adoption of novelty in consumption in a fruitful way. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Wilhelm Ruprecht, 2005. "The historical development of the consumption of sweeteners - a learning approach," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 247-272, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:15:y:2005:i:3:p:247-272 DOI: 10.1007/s00191-005-0253-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark Gertler, 1988. "Financial structure and aggregate economic activity: an overview," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 559-596.
    2. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1983. "Incentive Effects of Terminations: Applications to the Credit and Labor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 912-927.
    3. Mccallum, Bennet T., 1988. "Robustness properties of a rule for monetary policy," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, pages 173-203.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wilhelm Ruprecht, 2005. "From Carl Menger's Theory of Goods to an Evolutionary Approach to Consumer Behaviour," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2005-11, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    2. Ulrich Witt, 2006. "Evolutionary Economics and Psychology," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2006-13, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    3. Jan Schnellenbach, 2015. "Does classical liberalism imply an evolutionary approach to policy-making?," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, pages 53-70.
    4. Ulrich Witt, 2017. "The evolution of consumption and its welfare effects," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 273-293.
    5. Chai Andreas & Moneta Alessio, 2014. "Escaping Satiation Dynamics: Some Evidence from British Household Data," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 234(2-3), pages 299-327, April.
    6. Guido Buenstorf & Christian Cordes, 2007. "Can Sustainable Consumption Be Learned?," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2007-06, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    7. Schnellenbach, Jan, 2014. "Does classical liberalism imply an evolutionary approach to policy-making?," Freiburg Discussion Papers on Constitutional Economics 14/07, Walter Eucken Institut e.V..
    8. Buenstorf, Guido & Cordes, Christian, 2008. "Can sustainable consumption be learned? A model of cultural evolution," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(4), pages 646-657, November.
    9. Andreas Chai, 2017. "Tackling Keynes’ question: a look back on 15 years of Learning To Consume," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, pages 251-271.
    10. Vanessa OLTRA & Maïder SAINT JEAN, 2009. "Environmental Innovations and Industrial Dynamics (In French)," Cahiers du GREThA 2009-22, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    11. Benjamin Volland, 2013. "The History of an Inferior Good: Beer Consumption in Germany," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2012-19, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    12. Andreas Chai & Alessio Moneta, 2012. "Back to Engel? Some evidence for the hierarchy of needs," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 649-676, September.
    13. Christian Cordes, 2014. "There are several ways to incorporate evolutionary concepts into economic thinking," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2014-02, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.

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