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A quantile regression analysis of the rebound effect: Evidence from the 2009 National Household Transportation Survey in the United States

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  • Su, Qing

Abstract

This paper applies quantile regression method to measure the rebound effect and differentiate it with respect to demand for mobility using the 2009 National Household Transportation Survey (NHTS). The quantile regression results indicate that the rebound effect varies with the distribution of vehicle miles traveled (VMT), ranging between 0.11 and 0.19. Road network density and population density also play an important role in determining travel demand. Regression results indicate that travelers living in areas with higher road network density travel more miles although this positive impact consistently declines along the VMT distribution. Travelers living in areas with population density of at most 3000 persons per square miles travel more miles than those living in higher density areas. The quantile regression results also indicate that the impact of income is positive but declines consistently along the VMT distribution.

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  • Su, Qing, 2012. "A quantile regression analysis of the rebound effect: Evidence from the 2009 National Household Transportation Survey in the United States," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 368-377.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:45:y:2012:i:c:p:368-377
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2012.02.045
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Yue-Jun & Liu, Zhao & Qin, Chang-Xiong & Tan, Tai-De, 2017. "The direct and indirect CO2 rebound effect for private cars in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 149-161.
    2. Zhang, Yue-Jun & Peng, Hua-Rong & Liu, Zhao & Tan, Weiping, 2015. "Direct energy rebound effect for road passenger transport in China: A dynamic panel quantile regression approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 303-313.
    3. Stapleton, Lee & Sorrell, Steve & Schwanen, Tim, 2016. "Estimating direct rebound effects for personal automotive travel in Great Britain," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 313-325.
    4. Wang, Zhaohua & Lu, Milin, 2014. "An empirical study of direct rebound effect for road freight transport in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 274-281.
    5. Schleich, Joachim & Klobasa, Marian & Gölz, Sebastian & Brunner, Marc, 2013. "Effects of feedback on residential electricity demand—Findings from a field trial in Austria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1097-1106.
    6. Wang, Zhaohua & Han, Bai & Lu, Milin, 2016. "Measurement of energy rebound effect in households: Evidence from residential electricity consumption in Beijing, China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 852-861.
    7. Galvin, Ray, 2016. "Rebound effects from speed and acceleration in electric and internal combustion engine cars: An empirical and conceptual investigation," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 207-216.
    8. Sylvain Weber, 2017. "Consumers' preferences on the Swiss car market," IRENE Working Papers 16-12, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    9. repec:eee:eneeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:251-261 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:eco:journ2:2017-03-20 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Sylvain Weber & Mehdi Farsi, 2014. "Travel Distance and Fuel Efficiency: An Estimation of the Rebound Effect using Micro-Data in Switzerland," IRENE Working Papers 14-03, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    12. Yu, Xuewei & Moreno-Cruz, Juan & Crittenden, John C., 2015. "Regional energy rebound effect: The impact of economy-wide and sector level energy efficiency improvement in Georgia, USA," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 250-259.

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