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Travel Demand Management Policy Instruments, Urban Spatial Characteristics, and Household Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Travel in the US Urban Areas

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  • Qing Su

    (Department of Economics and Finance, Northern Kentucky University, BC 338, Nunn Drive, Highland Heights, KY 41099, USA.)

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of travel demand management (TDM) policy instruments and a wide variety of measures of urban spatial characteristics on CO2 emissions from household travel based on more than 27,000 observations from the 2009 National Household Travel Survey. The regression results indicate that TDM instruments and urban spatial characteristics affect CO2 emissions from household travel in a complicated way. Populationweighted density, rail availability, and TDM instruments such as parking management, promotion of transit use and carpool, and employer-based TDM programs have a moderate but negative impact on CO2 emissions from household travel. On the other hand, employment and population distribution imbalance and major road network density have a moderate but positive impact on CO2 emissions from household travel.

Suggested Citation

  • Qing Su, 2017. "Travel Demand Management Policy Instruments, Urban Spatial Characteristics, and Household Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Travel in the US Urban Areas," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 7(3), pages 157-166.
  • Handle: RePEc:eco:journ2:2017-03-20
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Parking Management; Promotion of Transit Use and Carpool; Employer-based Travel Demand Management Program; CO2 Emissions from Household Travel; Population-weighted Density; Employment and Population Distribution Imbalance;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics

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