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Can Land-use Policy Really Affect Travel Behaviour? A Study of the Link between Non-work Travel and Land-use Characteristics

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  • Marlon G. Boarnet

    (Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Irvine, CA92697, USA, mgboarne@uci.edu)

  • Sharon Sarmiento

    (Unison Consulting Group, Inc., Three Pointe Dive, Suite 104, Brea, CA 92821, USA, ssarmiento@earthlink.net)

Abstract

Planners are increasingly viewing land-use policy as a way to manage transport demand. Yet the evidence on the link between land use and travel behaviour is inconclusive. This paper uses travel diary data for southern California residents to examine the link between land-use patterns at the neighbourhood level and non-work trip generation for a sample of 769 individuals. The number of non-work automobile trips that an individual makes in a two-day period is modelled as a function of socio-demographic variables and land-use characteristics near the person's place of residence. The land-use variables are statistically insignificant in all but one of the specifications. The results suggest that choices about how to measure the variables and how to specify the regressions can influence the conclusions from these studies in potentially important ways. This underscores the need for continued careful attention to these research issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Marlon G. Boarnet & Sharon Sarmiento, 1998. "Can Land-use Policy Really Affect Travel Behaviour? A Study of the Link between Non-work Travel and Land-use Characteristics," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 35(7), pages 1155-1169, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:urbstu:v:35:y:1998:i:7:p:1155-1169
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    1. Bento, Antonio M. & Cropper, Maureen L. & Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq & Vinha, Katja, 2003. "The impact of urban spatial structure on travel demand in the United States," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3007, The World Bank.
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    5. Kim, Jinwon, 2012. "Endogenous vehicle-type choices in a monocentric city," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 749-760.
    6. Veronique Acker & Frank Witlox, 2011. "Commuting trips within tours: how is commuting related to land use?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 465-486, May.
    7. Xiaoquan Wang & Chunfu Shao & Chaoying Yin & Chengxiang Zhuge & Wenjun Li, 2018. "Application of Bayesian Multilevel Models Using Small and Medium Size City in China: The Case of Changchun," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-15, February.
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    10. Bagley, Michael N, 1999. "Incorporating Residential Choice into Travel Behavior-Land Use Interaction Research: A Conceptual Model with Methodologies for Investigating Causal Relationships," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2ws1x83f, University of California Transportation Center.
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