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Public spending and growth: The role of government accountability

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  • Morozumi, Atsuyoshi
  • Veiga, Francisco José

Abstract

This paper examines the role of institutions in the nexus between public spending and economic growth. Empirical results based on a newly assembled dataset of 80 countries over the 1970–2010 period suggest that particularly when institutions prompt governments to be accountable to the general citizen does public capital spending promote growth. Taking account of the type of financing for this spending, we show that the growth-promoting effect under an accountable government appears to prevail for various financing sources, including a reallocation from current spending, an increase in revenue, and a rise in the budget deficit. However, government accountability does not seem to play a key role in the growth effects of current spending.

Suggested Citation

  • Morozumi, Atsuyoshi & Veiga, Francisco José, 2016. "Public spending and growth: The role of government accountability," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 148-171.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:89:y:2016:i:c:p:148-171
    DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2016.07.001
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    Cited by:

    1. Ghosh, Sugata & Mitra, Anirban, 2016. "Ethnic Diversity, Public Spending and Political Regimes," MPRA Paper 75546, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public spending; Economic growth; Institutions; Government accountability; Financing method;

    JEL classification:

    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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