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Do more diverse environments increase the diversity of subsequent interaction? Evidence from random dorm assignment

Author

Listed:
  • Baker, Sara
  • Mayer, Adalbert
  • Puller, Steven L.

Abstract

Exposing university students to members of a different race via random dorm assignment increases the number of different race friends in the dorm, but does not increase the diversity of social networks outside that environment, based upon data from Facebook.

Suggested Citation

  • Baker, Sara & Mayer, Adalbert & Puller, Steven L., 2011. "Do more diverse environments increase the diversity of subsequent interaction? Evidence from random dorm assignment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 110(2), pages 110-112, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:110:y:2011:i:2:p:110-112
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Marmaros & Bruce Sacerdote, 2006. "How Do Friendships Form?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(1), pages 79-119.
    2. Camargo, Bráz Ministério de & Stinebrickner, Ralph & Stinebrickner, Todd, 2010. "Affirmative action and interracial friendships," Textos para discussão 200, FGV/EESP - Escola de Economia de São Paulo, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    3. Yannis M. Ioannides & Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Information Networks, Neighborhood Effects, and Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1056-1093, December.
    4. Mayer, Adalbert & Puller, Steven L., 2008. "The old boy (and girl) network: Social network formation on university campuses," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1-2), pages 329-347, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Arcidiacono & Esteban Aucejo & Andrew Hussey & Kenneth Spenner, 2013. "Racial Segregation Patterns in Selective Universities," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56(4), pages 1039-1060.
    2. Susan Biancani & Daniel McFarland, 2013. "Social Networks Research in Higher Education," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 4, pages 85-126.
    3. Merlino, Luca Paolo & Steinhardt, Max F. & Wren-Lewis, Liam, 2016. "More than Just Friends? School Peers and Adult Interracial Relationships," IZA Discussion Papers 10319, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. repec:bpj:glecon:v:17:y:2017:i:1:p:33:n:5 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Marina Murat, 2014. "Soft, hard or smart power? International students and investments abroad," Department of Economics 0043, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    6. Murat, Marina, 2014. "Out of Sight, Not Out of Mind. Education Networks and International Trade," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 53-66.
    7. repec:mod:depeco:0002 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Marina Murat, 2014. "Soft, hard or smart power? International students and investments abroad," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 107, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    9. Peter Arcidiacono & Michael Lovenheim, 2016. "Affirmative Action and the Quality-Fit Trade-Off," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(1), pages 3-51, March.
    10. Benjamin Edelman, 2012. "Using Internet Data for Economic Research," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 189-206, Spring.
    11. repec:mod:depeco:0014 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Ekaterina V. Krekhovets & Liudmila A. Leonova, 2016. "Social Ties of University Students: Evidence from a Longitudinal Survey in Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 33/EDU/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    13. Scott E. Carrell & Mark Hoekstra & James E. West, 2015. "The Impact of Intergroup Contact on Racial Attitudes and Revealed Preferences," NBER Working Papers 20940, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Marina Murat, 2013. "Education ties and investments abroad. Empirical evidence from the US and UK," Department of Economics (DEMB) 0014, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    15. repec:hig:wpaper:33edu2015 is not listed on IDEAS

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