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A bioeconomic model of trophy hunting

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  • Naevdal, Eric
  • Olaussen, Jon Olaf
  • Skonhoft, Anders

Abstract

During the last few decades wildlife trophy hunting has increasingly replaced traditional meat hunting. The economics of trophy hunting is analyzed with the Scandinavian moose (Alces alces) serving as an example. A four-stage model (calf, yearlings, adult female and adult male) is formulated. The calves, yearlings, and females are hunted for meat, while the males are hunted for trophies and where the demand for trophy hunting depends on price and quality. We find that trophy hunting boosts the male population and yields a high ratio of males to females. The main reason for this result is that we consider a management scheme with well defined property rights and not of the ‘open-access’ type, and where the key mechanism is the quality demand effect in trophy hunting. In an extended model where ecological theory of animal adoption to hunting is assumed to influence the biology through fertility we still find that trophy hunting boosts the male stock.

Suggested Citation

  • Naevdal, Eric & Olaussen, Jon Olaf & Skonhoft, Anders, 2012. "A bioeconomic model of trophy hunting," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 194-205.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:73:y:2012:i:c:p:194-205 DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2011.10.026
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    Cited by:

    1. Skonhoft, Anders & Gong, Peichen, 2014. "Wild salmon fishing: Harvesting the old or young?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 417-435.
    2. Olaussen, Jon Olaf & Skonhoft, Anders, 2011. "A cost-benefit analysis of moose harvesting in Scandinavia. A stage structured modelling approach," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 589-611, September.
    3. Martin F. Quaas & Till Requate, 2013. "Sushi or Fish Fingers? Seafood Diversity, Collapsing Fish Stocks, and Multispecies Fishery Management," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 115(2), pages 381-422, April.
    4. Anders Skonhoft & Wenting Chen, 2011. "On the management of interconnected wildlife populations," Working Paper Series 12311, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    5. Herruzo, A.C. & Martínez-Jauregui, M. & Carranza, J. & Campos, P., 2016. "Commercial income and capital of hunting: an application to forest estates in Andalucía," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 53-61.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trophy hunting; Population model; Behavioral ecology;

    JEL classification:

    • Q26 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Recreational Aspects of Natural Resources
    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices

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