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On the management of interconnected wildlife populations

Author

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  • Anders Skonhoft

    () (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Wenting Chen

    (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

Abstract

Economic interdependency of wildlife or fish stocks is usually attributed to ecological interdependency, such as predator - prey and competitive relationships, or to density dependent migration of species between different areas. This paper provides another channel for economic interdependency of wildlife where density independent migration and market price interaction affect the management strategies among different landowners. Management is studied under three market conditions for selling hunting licences: price taking behaviour, monopoly market and duopoly market. Harvesting of the Scandinavian moose is used as an example. The paper provides several results on how economic interdependency works through the migration pattern. When a duopoly market is introduced, hunting license price interaction among the landowners plays an additional role in determining the optimal harvesting strategy.

Suggested Citation

  • Anders Skonhoft & Wenting Chen, 2011. "On the management of interconnected wildlife populations," Working Paper Series 12311, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  • Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:12311
    as

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    File URL: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/2011/14_moosewenting%20final%201211.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard Horan & Erwin Bulte, 2004. "Optimal and Open Access Harvesting of Multi-Use Species in a Second-Best World," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 28(3), pages 251-272, July.
    2. Armstrong, Claire W. & Skonhoft, Anders, 2006. "Marine reserves: A bio-economic model with asymmetric density dependent migration," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 466-476, May.
    3. Horan, R.D. & Bulte, E.H., 2004. "Optimal and open access harvesting and multi-use species in a second best world," Other publications TiSEM 95000e50-7225-4f4d-aeaf-a, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    4. Halsema, Alex & Withagen, Cees, 2008. "Managing multiple fishery pools: property rights regimes and market structures," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(06), pages 775-794, December.
    5. Naevdal, Eric & Olaussen, Jon Olaf & Skonhoft, Anders, 2012. "A bioeconomic model of trophy hunting," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 194-205.
    6. Hannesson, Rognvaldur, 1983. "Optimal harvesting of ecologically interdependent fish species," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 329-345, December.
    7. Sanchirico, James N. & Wilen, James E., 2001. "A Bioeconomic Model of Marine Reserve Creation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 257-276, November.
    8. Schulz, Carl-Erik & Skonhoft, Anders, 1996. "Wildlife management, land-use and conflicts," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(03), pages 265-280, July.
    9. Frank Stähler, 1996. "On International compensations for environmental stocks," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 8(1), pages 1-13, July.
    10. Dockner,Engelbert J. & Jorgensen,Steffen & Long,Ngo Van & Sorger,Gerhard, 2000. "Differential Games in Economics and Management Science," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521637329, May.
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