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Teaching styles and achievement: Student and teacher perspectives

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  • Hidalgo-Cabrillana, Ana
  • Lopez-Mayan, Cristina

Abstract

We analyze the relationship between the use of modern and traditional teaching styles and the achievement in math and reading in primary education. As a novelty, we explore whether that relationship is different if we use teachers or students as source to measure in–class work. We find that who reports the practices matters. Teamwork and class discussions—modern practices—are strongly related to better achievement, while rote learning and individual work—traditional practices—to lower achievement. But that association is only significant when using students’ reports. Teaching styles are differently related to achievement along several dimensions—math and reading, boys and girls, public/private students—but again basically when we rely on students’ reports. The analysis of the differences in the perspectives does not show conclusive evidence about the student and teacher characteristics that explain those differences. Only being girl or high achiever predicts a lower use of modern practices.

Suggested Citation

  • Hidalgo-Cabrillana, Ana & Lopez-Mayan, Cristina, 2018. "Teaching styles and achievement: Student and teacher perspectives," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 184-206.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:67:y:2018:i:c:p:184-206
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2018.10.009
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    2. Sule Alan & Enes Duysak & Elif Kubilay & Ipek Mumcu, 2020. "Social Exclusion and Ethnic Segregation in Schools: The Role of Teacher's Ethnic Prejudice," Working Papers 2020-044, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    3. Sarah Flèche, 2017. "Teacher Quality, Test Scores and Non-Cognitive Skills: Evidence from Primary School Teachers in the UK," CEP Discussion Papers dp1472, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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    5. José Antonio Molina Marfil & Oscar David Marcenaro Gutierrez & Ana Martín Marcos, 2016. "Procesos de enseñanza-aprendizaje y producción educativa: un análisis de la competencia matemática," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 11, in: José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 11, edition 1, volume 11, chapter 32, pages 585-604, Asociación de Economía de la Educación.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Students and teacher reports; Test scores; Teacher quality; Modern and traditional teaching;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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