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Do Teaching Practices Matter for Students' Academic Achievement? A case of linguistic activity

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  • TANAKA Ryuichi
  • ISHIZAKI Kazumi

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effects of teaching practices on the educational achievement of elementary school students. Using unique student-level test score data and controlling for school fixed effects, we estimate the impact of linguistic activity in the classroom on reading and mathematics test scores of sixth grade students. We find that linguistic activities improve students reading and mathematics test scores and that their impacts are substantial. We find heterogeneity in the effect of these activities across class size environment and home environment such as cram schooling. These findings indicate that the types of language teaching practices matter for students' academic achievement, and the effectiveness may depend on the learning environment in school and at home.

Suggested Citation

  • TANAKA Ryuichi & ISHIZAKI Kazumi, 2017. "Do Teaching Practices Matter for Students' Academic Achievement? A case of linguistic activity," Discussion papers 17108, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  • Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:17108
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    Cited by:

    1. Kubota, Kohei & Ito, Takahiro & Ohtake, Fumio, 2019. "Long-term consequences of group work in Japanese public elementary schools," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C).
    2. Tanaka, Ryuichi & Bessho, Shun-ichiro & Kawamura, Akira & Noguchi, Haruko & Ushijima, Koichi, 2020. "Determinants of Teacher Value-Added in Public Primary Schools: Evidence from Administrative Panel Data," IZA Discussion Papers 13146, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Motegi, Hiroyuki & Oikawa, Masato, 2019. "The effect of instructional quality on student achievement: Evidence from Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education

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