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Class-size effects in Japanese schools: A spline regression approach

Author

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  • Hojo, Masakazu

Abstract

This study introduces a piecewise-linear relationship between student achievement and class size. Using student-level data from Japan, we find that piecewise-linear specifications clearly show a better fit to the data. We also find that a significant class-size effect is observed in the lower part of the class-size distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Hojo, Masakazu, 2013. "Class-size effects in Japanese schools: A spline regression approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(3), pages 583-587.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:120:y:2013:i:3:p:583-587
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.06.027
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thomas Fuchs & Ludger Wößmann, 2007. "What accounts for international differences in student performance? A re-examination using PISA data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 433-464, May.
    2. Miguel Urquiola & Eric Verhoogen, 2009. "Class-Size Caps, Sorting, and the Regression-Discontinuity Design," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(1), pages 179-215, March.
    3. Oriana Bandiera & Valentino Larcinese & Imran Rasul, 2010. "Heterogeneous Class Size Effects: New Evidence from a Panel of University Students," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(549), pages 1365-1398, December.
    4. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "The Effects of Class Size on Student Achievement: New Evidence from Population Variation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1239-1285.
    5. Edward P. Lazear, 2001. "Educational Production," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(3), pages 777-803.
    6. Christopher Jepsen & Steven Rivkin, 2009. "Class Size Reduction and Student Achievement: The Potential Tradeoff between Teacher Quality and Class Size," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(1).
    7. Kawaguchi, Daiji, 2011. "Actual age at school entry, educational outcomes, and earnings," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 64-80, June.
    8. Joshua D. Angrist & Victor Lavy, 1999. "Using Maimonides' Rule to Estimate the Effect of Class Size on Scholastic Achievement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 533-575.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. ITO Hirotake & NAKAMURO Makiko & YAMAGUCHI Shintaro, 2019. "Effects of Class-Size Reduction on Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills," Discussion papers 19036, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. Hirotake Ito & Makiko Nakamuro & Shintaro Yamaguchi, 2019. "Effects of Class-Size Reduction, On Cognitive and Non-cognitive Skills," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1113, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    3. Christopher Jepsen, 2015. "Class size: Does it matter for student achievement?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 190-190, September.
    4. repec:eee:jjieco:v:50:y:2018:i:c:p:26-36 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Polcyn, Jan, 2017. "Edukacja jako dobro publiczne - próba kwantyfikacji
      [Education as a public good – an attempt at quantification]
      ," MPRA Paper 76606, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2017.
    6. Tanaka, Ryuichi & Ishizaki, Kazumi, 2018. "Do teaching practices matter for students’ academic achievement? A case of linguistic activity," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 26-36.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Class size; Education; Japan;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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