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Are all admission sub-tests created equal? — Evidence from a National Key University in China

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  • Yang, Guangliang

Abstract

In China, higher education admissions are rigorously based on the total scores of admission tests. Admission subject tests, however, each have different relationships with undergraduate academic performance. Undergraduate academic performance is an important reference variable in applying for graduate schools and finding employment. Admission measures considering the relative importance of subject tests could be employed to select academically more able applicants. Subjects comprise Chinese, mathematics, English, and a comprehensive subject. Data are collected from a national key university in China. The empirical results show that the correlation of subject tests with undergraduate academic performance always differs, and that the pattern varies according to admission track and academic discipline in the university. The conclusions are robust to different specifications and over time. Policy implications are also discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Yang, Guangliang, 2014. "Are all admission sub-tests created equal? — Evidence from a National Key University in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 600-617.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:30:y:2014:i:c:p:600-617
    DOI: 10.1016/j.chieco.2013.12.002
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    Cited by:

    1. Ong, David & Xie, Man & Zhang, Junsen, 2020. "The College Admissions Contribution to the Labor Market Beauty Premium," MPRA Paper 98517, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    National College Entrance Examination; Undergraduate grade; Subject test;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions

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