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How will financial liberalization change the Chinese economy? Lessons from middle-income countries

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  • Huang, Yiping
  • Ji, Yang

Abstract

This study projects the impact of financial liberalization in China by drawing on the experiences of 60 middle-income economies over a period of four decades. Our results suggest that comprehensive financial reform could increase GDP growth per capita by up to 1.4% points and raise the real bank lending rate by up to 5.1% points. Perhaps the most unexpected result is a massive increase in net capital inflows by up to 20.1% of GDP, which could plant seeds for financial risks later. The probability of a currency crisis could increase by up to 21.7% points, but the probability of a banking crisis may rise or fall, depending on the quality of bank supervision. We also find different policy impacts of different financial reform measures. Bank ownership reform and regulatory reform are critical in supporting economic growth and financial stability. These findings offer important policy implications on how to derive maximum benefit from financial reforms while effectively mitigating potential risks.

Suggested Citation

  • Huang, Yiping & Ji, Yang, 2017. "How will financial liberalization change the Chinese economy? Lessons from middle-income countries," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 27-45.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:50:y:2017:i:c:p:27-45
    DOI: 10.1016/j.asieco.2017.04.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial liberalization; Economic growth; Financial risk; China;

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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