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Are Blondes Really Dumb?

Author

Listed:
  • Jay L Zagorsky

    () (The Ohio State University)

Abstract

Discrimination based on appearance has serious economic consequences. Women with blonde hair are often considered beautiful, but dumb, which is a potentially harmful stereotype since many employers seek intelligent workers. Using the NLSY79, a large nationally representative survey tracking young baby boomers, this research analyzes the IQ of white women and men according to hair color. Blonde women have a higher mean IQ than women with brown, red and black hair. Blondes are more likely classified as geniuses and less likely to have extremely low IQ than women with other hair colors, suggesting the dumb blonde stereotype is a myth.

Suggested Citation

  • Jay L Zagorsky, 2016. "Are Blondes Really Dumb?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(1), pages 401-410.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-15-00602
    as

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2016/Volume36/EB-16-V36-I1-P42.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Discrimination; intelligence; hair color; blonde; brunette; beauty; wages; AFQT; IQ;

    JEL classification:

    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior

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