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Intrahousehold Distribution in Migrant-Sending Families

Author

Listed:
  • Lucia MANGIAVACCHI

    (University of the Balearic Islands and IZA)

  • Federico PERALI

    (University of Verona)

  • Luca Piccoli

    (University of the Balearic Islands and IZA)

Abstract

This paper studies the distribution of resources within families with migrant member abroad. We derive a complete collective demand system with individual Engel effects for male and female adults and children, and the respective share of resources. The focus is on migrant-sending families in Albania, where gender and inter-generational inequalities are relevant social issues. The results show that the female share of resources is substantially lower with respect to an equal distribution and do not benefit from father’s migration. Children have a larger share of resources and benefit from their fathers migration, when women maintain control over family decisions and when the proportion of female children is larger (at the detriment of women).

Suggested Citation

  • Lucia MANGIAVACCHI & Federico PERALI & Luca Piccoli, 2018. "Intrahousehold Distribution in Migrant-Sending Families," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 84(1), pages 107-148, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvde:v:84:y:2018:i:1:p:107-148
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1017/dem.2017.24
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. El Badaoui, Eliane & Mangiavacchi, Lucia, 2018. "Fostering, Child Welfare, and Ethnic Cultural Values," IZA Discussion Papers 11691, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Luca Piccoli, 2017. "Female poverty and intrahousehold inequality in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 353-353, March.
    3. Gianni Betti & Lucia Mangiavacchi & Luca Piccoli, 2017. "Individual poverty measurement using a fuzzy intrahousehold approach," Department of Economics University of Siena 747, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    4. Lucia Mangiavacchi, 2016. "Family structure and children’s educational attainment in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 303-303, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intrahousehold distribution; Collective demand system; Sharing rule; International migration; Left behind; Albania;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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