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Non-Classical Measurement Error in Long-Term Retrospective Recall Surveys

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  • John Gibson
  • Bonggeun Kim

Abstract

Applied microeconomic researchers are beginning to use long-term retrospective survey data in settings where conventional longitudinal survey data are unavailable. However, inaccurate long-term recall could induce non-classical measurement error, for which conventional statistical corrections are less effective. In this article, we use the unique Panel Study of Income Dynamics Validation Study to assess the accuracy of long-term retrospective recall data. We find underreporting of transitory variation which creates a non-classical measurement error problem. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd and the Department of Economics, University of Oxford, 2010.

Suggested Citation

  • John Gibson & Bonggeun Kim, 2010. "Non-Classical Measurement Error in Long-Term Retrospective Recall Surveys," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(5), pages 687-695, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:72:y:2010:i:5:p:687-695
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fleisher, Belton M. & Wang, Xiaojun, 2005. "Returns to schooling in China under planning and reform," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 265-277, June.
    2. H. Elizabeth Peters, 1988. "Retrospective Versus Panel Data in Analyzing Lifecycle Events," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(4), pages 488-513.
    3. Stephen R. Boucher & Aaron Smith & J. Edward Taylor & Antonio Yúnez-Naude, 2007. "Impacts of Policy Reforms on the Supply of Mexican Labor to U.S. Farms: New Evidence from Mexico," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 29(1), pages 4-16.
    4. James P. Smith & Duncan Thomas, 2003. "Remembrances of things past: test-retest reliability of retrospective migration histories," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 166(1), pages 23-49.
    5. Gillian Paull, 2002. "Biases in the reporting of labour market dynamics," IFS Working Papers W02/10, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    6. Bonggeun Kim & Gary Solon, 2005. "Implications of Mean-Reverting Measurement Error for Longitudinal Studies of Wages and Employment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 193-196, February.
    7. Charles R. Pierret, 2001. "Event History Data and Survey Recall: An Analysis of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Recall Experiment," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(3), pages 439-466.
    8. Kennickell, Arthur B & Starr-McCluer, Martha, 1997. "Retrospective Reporting of Household Wealth: Evidence from the 1983-1989 Survey of Consumer Finances," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(4), pages 452-463, October.
    9. Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1995. "Measurement Error and Earnings Dynamics: Some Estimates from the PSID Validation Study," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(3), pages 305-314, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. John Gibson & Kathleen Beegle & Joachim De Weerdt & Jed Friedman, 2015. "What does Variation in Survey Design Reveal about the Nature of Measurement Errors in Household Consumption?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 77(3), pages 466-474, June.
    2. Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel & Chiripanhura, Blessing M., 2013. "The Impacts of the Food, fuel and Financial Crises on Households in Nigeria: A Retrospective Approach for Research Enquiry," WIDER Working Paper Series 058, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Blessing M. Chiripanhura & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, 2016. "The impacts of the food, fuel and financial crises on poor and vulnerable households in Nigeria: A retrospective approach to research inquiry," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(6), pages 763-788, November.
    4. Li, Chao & Gibson, John, 2013. "Rising Regional Inequality in China: Fact or Artifact?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 16-29.
    5. Klemm, Marcus, 2011. "You Don't Know what You've got till It's Gone! Unemployment and Intertemporal Changes in Self-Reported Life Satisfaction," Ruhr Economic Papers 297, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Marcus Klemm, 2011. "You Don‘t Know what You‘ve got till It‘s Gone! Unemployment and Intertemporal Changes in Self-Reported Life Satisfaction," Ruhr Economic Papers 0297, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    7. McKenzie, David, 2012. "Beyond baseline and follow-up: The case for more T in experiments," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 210-221.
    8. Marcus Klemm, 2011. "You Don't Know What You've Got till It's Gone!: Unemployment and Intertemporal Changes in Self-Reported Life Satisfaction," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 421, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Ragui Assaad & Caroline Krafft & Shaimaa Yassin, 2016. "Comparing Retrospective and Panel Data Collection Methods to Assess Labor Market Dynamics," Working Papers 994, Economic Research Forum, revised Apr 2016.
    10. repec:zbw:rwirep:0297 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:bla:manchs:v:85:y:2017:i:1:p:41-64 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Jorik Vergauwen & Jonas Wood & David De Wachter & Karel Neels, 2015. "Quality of demographic data in GGS Wave 1," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(24), pages 723-774, March.

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