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Why the Keynesian Multiplier Increases During Hard Times: A Theoretical Explanation Based on Rentiers' Saving Behaviour

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  • Sébastien Charles
  • Thomas Dallery
  • Jonathan Marie

Abstract

type="main"> This article analyses the Keynesian multiplier from a new perspective. Recent empirical studies emphasize that the multiplier is endogenous to the level of economic activity, increasing during recessions and declining in expansions. Here, we propose a plausible explanation for this established fact based on the procyclicality of capitalists' propensity to save. Then, using a standard Kaleckian model of growth and distribution, we perform some simple simulations showing that fiscal multipliers increase during turbulent times. Consequently, this argues against cutting public spending for economies in recession.

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  • Sébastien Charles & Thomas Dallery & Jonathan Marie, 2015. "Why the Keynesian Multiplier Increases During Hard Times: A Theoretical Explanation Based on Rentiers' Saving Behaviour," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 451-473, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:metroe:v:66:y:2015:i:3:p:451-473
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/meca.12075
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Bagnai & Christian Alexander Mongeau Ospina, 2018. "Monetary integration vs. real disintegration: single currency and productivity divergence in the euro area," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 353-367, October.
    2. Theodore Mariolis & Nikolaos Ntemiroglou & George Soklis, 2018. "The static demand multipliers in a joint production framework: comparative findings for the Greek, Spanish and Eurozone economies," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 7(1), pages 1-20, December.
    3. Mark Setterfield, 2015. "Time variation in the size of the multiplier: a Kalecki-Harrod approach," Working Papers 1522, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2017.
    4. Pragidis, I.C. & Tsintzos, P. & Plakandaras, B., 2018. "Asymmetric effects of government spending shocks during the financial cycle," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 372-387.

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