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Imports and the income-expenditure model: implications for fiscal policy and recession fighting

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  • Thomas I. Palley

Abstract

This paper modifies the textbook income-expenditure model to properly account for imports. This modification causes government spending to have an even larger relative impact compared to tax cuts than conventionally thought. It also shows that increased government spending can have a smaller impact on the trade deficit than tax cuts despite spending having a larger multiplier effect on income. Consequently, spending may be doubly advantaged over tax cuts as a means of reflating economic activity. Last, the paper shows that consumption tax cuts can be an antistimulus that reduces aggregate demand and output.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas I. Palley, 2009. "Imports and the income-expenditure model: implications for fiscal policy and recession fighting," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 311-322, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:postke:v:32:y:2009:i:2:p:311-322
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sébastien Charles & Thomas Dallery & Jonathan Marie, 2015. "Le multiplicateur keynésien en récession : pourquoi une relance est-elle davantage nécessaire aujourd'hui en zone euro ?," CEPN Policy Brief, Centre d'Economie de l'Université de Paris Nord, vol. 7, pages 1-4.
    2. Porcile, Gabriel & Sartorello Spinola, Danilo, 2018. "Natural, effective and BOP-constrained rates of growth: Adjustment mechanisms and closure equations," MERIT Working Papers 003, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    3. Pusch, Toralf & Rannenberg, Ansgar, 2011. "Fiscal Spending Multiplier Calculations based on Input-Output Tables – with an Application to EU Members," IWH Discussion Papers 1/2011, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    4. Alicja Sekula & Joanna Smiechowicz, 2016. "Systems Of General Grants For Local Governments In Selected Eu Countries Against The Background Of The General Theory Of Fiscal Policy," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 11(4), pages 711-734, December.
    5. Kazimierz Łaski & Jerzy Osiatyński & Jolanta Zięba, 2012. "Fiscal multipliers and factors of growth in Poland and the Czech Republic in 2009," NBP Working Papers 117, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    6. Sébastien Charles & Thomas Dallery & Jonathan Marie, 2015. "Why the Keynesian Multiplier Increases During Hard Times: A Theoretical Explanation Based on Rentiers' Saving Behaviour," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 451-473, July.
    7. Elias Soukiazis & Micaela Antunes & Ioannis Kostakis, 2016. "The Greek economy under the twin-deficit pressure: a demand orientated growth approach," GEMF Working Papers 2016-08, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    8. Kazimierz Laski & Jerzy Osiatynski & Jolanta Zieba, 2010. "The Government Expenditure Multiplier and its Estimates for Poland in 2006-2009," wiiw Working Papers 63, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    9. Eduardo A. Haddad & Natalia Q. Cotarelli, Thiago C. Simonato, Vinicius A. Vale & Jaqueline C. Visentin, 2018. "The Grand Tour: Keynes and Goodwin go to Greece," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2018_01, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).

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