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Making dollars and sense of the U.S. government debt

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  • Paul Davidson

Abstract

This paper explain why, given Keynes's General Theory, worries over the size of the government's national debt per se are foolish. It is more important to educate politicians and the public that government fiscal policy should be designed to make sure that aggregate market demand will produce sufficient profits so that entrepreneurs will hire all domestic workers willing and able to work. Empirical evidence is provided to demonstrate the correctness of this concept of fiscal policy of the balancing wheel for full employment effective demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Davidson, 2010. "Making dollars and sense of the U.S. government debt," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(4), pages 661-666, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:postke:v:32:y:2010:i:4:p:661-666
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Skott, 2016. "Aggregate demand, functional finance, and secular stagnation," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 13(2), pages 172-188, September.
    2. Soon Ryoo & Peter Skott, 2013. "Public debt and full employment in a stock-flow consistent model of a corporate economy," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 511-528.
    3. S├ębastien Charles & Thomas Dallery & Jonathan Marie, 2015. "Why the Keynesian Multiplier Increases During Hard Times: A Theoretical Explanation Based on Rentiers' Saving Behaviour," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 451-473, July.
    4. Hassan Bougrine, 2012. "Fiscal austerity, the Great Recession and the rise of new dictatorships," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 1(0), pages 109-125.
    5. Enrico Gabriele, 2017. "Re-Evaluating The Keynesian Multiplier: Critiques And Evidence From Europe," CERBE Working Papers wpC21, CERBE Center for Relationship Banking and Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    deficits; national debt;

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