IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Public debt and full employment in a stock-flow consistent model of a corporate economy

  • Soon Ryoo

    ()

    (Adelphi University)

  • Peter Skott

    ()

    (University of Massachusetts Amherst)

This paper examines the fiscal requirements for continuous full employment. We find that (i) changes in the financial behavior of households and firms require adjustments in tax rates and public debt, (ii) the stability of the steady-state solution for public debt depends on the .fiscal instrument and the household consumption function, (iii) in stable cases, a fall in government consumption (or a decline in another component of autonomous demand) requires an increase in the steady-state ratio of public debt to capital, and (iv) the steady-state tax rate may be positively or negatively related to the level of debt. JEL Categories: E62, E22

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.umass.edu/economics/publications/2011-26.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics in its series UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers with number 2011-26.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Oct 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ums:papers:2011-26
Contact details of provider: Postal: Thompson Hall, Amherst, MA 01003
Phone: (413)545-2590
Fax: (413)545-2921
Web page: http://www.umass.edu/economics
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Wynne Goldey & Marc Lavoie, 2007. "Fiscal policy in a stock-flow consistent (SFC) model," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 30(1), pages 79-100, October.
  2. Yeva Nersisyan & L. Randall Wray, 2010. "Deficit Hysteria Redux? Why We Should Stop Worrying About U.S. Government Deficits," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_111, Levy Economics Institute.
  3. Nakatani, Takeshi & Skott, Peter, 2007. "Japanese growth and stagnation: A Keynesian perspective," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 306-332, September.
  4. Peter Skott, 2012. "Theoretical And Empirical Shortcomings Of The Kaleckian Investment Function," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(1), pages 109-138, 02.
  5. Schlicht, Ekkehart, 2008. "Public Debt as Private Wealth," Munich Reprints in Economics 2143, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  6. Thomas I. Palley, 2010. "The Simple Macroeconomics of Fiscal Austerity, Public Sector Debt and Deflation," IMK Working Paper 8-2010, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  7. Asada, Toichiro & Chiarella, Carl & Flaschel, Peter & Mouakil, Tarik & Proaño, Christian R., 2010. "Stabilizing an unstable economy: On the choice of proper policy measures," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy, vol. 4, pages 1-43.
  8. Peter Skott, 2011. "Increasing inequality and financial instability," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2011-20, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
  9. Soon Ryoo, 2009. "Long waves and short cycles in a model of endogenous financial fragility," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2009-03, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
  10. Peter Skott & Soon Ryoo, 2007. "Macroeconomic implications of financialization," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2007-08, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
  11. Ekkehart Schlicht, 2006. "Public Debt As Private Wealth: Some Equilibrium Considerations," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(4), pages 494-520, November.
  12. Philip Arestis & Malcolm Sawyer, 2010. "The return of fiscal policy," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 32(3), pages 327-346, April.
  13. Peter Skott & Ben Zipperer, 2012. "An empirical evaluation of three post-Keynesian models," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar, vol. 9(2), pages 277-307.
  14. Stephen Cecchetti & Madhusudan Mohanty & Fabrizio Zampolli, 2010. "The future of public debt: prospects and implications," BIS Working Papers 300, Bank for International Settlements.
  15. Eckhard Hein & Marc Lavoie & Till van Treeck, 2012. "Harrodian Instability And The ‘Normal Rate’ Of Capacity Utilization In Kaleckian Models Of Distribution And Growth—A Survey," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(1), pages 139-169, 02.
  16. Peter Skott, . "Demand Policy in the Long Run," Economics Working Papers 2000-17, School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus.
  17. Paul Davidson, 2010. "Making dollars and sense of the U.S. government debt," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 32(4), pages 661-666, July.
  18. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521066310 is not listed on IDEAS
  19. Jan Kregel, 2010. "Fiscal Responsibility: What Exactly Does It Mean?," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_602, Levy Economics Institute.
  20. Peter Skott & Soon Ryoo, 2011. "Public debt in an OLG model with imperfect competition," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2011-25, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ums:papers:2011-26. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Arslan Razmi)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.