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Inequality, Debt Servicing, and the Sustainability of Steady State Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Mark Setterfield

    () (Department of Economics, New School for Social Research)

  • Yun K. Kim

    () (Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts, Boston)

  • Jeremy Rees

    () (Department of Economics, Trinity College)

Abstract

We investigate the claim that the way in which debtor households service their debts matters for macroeconomic performance. A standard Kaleckian growth model is modified to incorporate working households who borrow to finance consumption that is determined, in part, by the desire to emulate the consumption patterns of more affluent households. The impact of this behavior on the sustainability of the growth process is then studied by means of a numerical analysis that captures various dimensions of income inequality. When compared to previous contributions to the literature, our results show that the way in which debtor households service their debt has both quantitative and qualitative effects on the economy’s macrodynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Setterfield & Yun K. Kim & Jeremy Rees, 2014. "Inequality, Debt Servicing, and the Sustainability of Steady State Growth," Working Papers 1404, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:new:wpaper:1404
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yun K. Kim & Gilberto Tadeu Lima & Mark Setterfield, 2017. "Political Aspects of Household Debt," Working Papers 1724, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
    2. Yun K. Kim & Alan G. Isaac, 2017. "Firms’ Retention Behavior, Debt, and Macroeconomic Dynamics," Working Papers 2017_04, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
    3. Yun K. Kim, 2017. "Rise of Household Debt and the Great Recession in the US: Comparative Perspectives," Working Papers 2017_03, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
    4. Gustavo Pereira Serra & Gilberto Tadeu Lima, 2016. "Sustainability of Student Debt in a Demand-Led Macrodynamics," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2016_15, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    5. Mark Setterfield, 2014. "Rising Income Inequality, Increased Household Indebtedness, and Post Keynesian Macrodynamics," Working Papers 1403, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer debt; emulation; income distribution; Golden Age regime; Neoliberal regime; expenditure cascades; growth;

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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