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Firms’ Retention Behavior, Debt, and Macroeconomic Dynamics

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  • Yun K. Kim
  • Alan G. Isaac

Abstract

Building upon Isaac and Kim (2013) and Charles (2008a), we incorporate endogenous retention behavior of firms into a a stock-flow consistent neo-Kaleckian growth model with both consumer and corporate debt. We adopt a logistic endogenous retention ratio, which is a realistic representation of firms retention behavior. We then explore the macrodynamic ramifications. Consumer credit expansion can enhance the stability of the system. Higher interest has a destabilizing effect, and can induce a rather dramatic instability. More prudent firms financial behavior by relying more on their retained earnings reduces the stability of the system although it promotes growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Yun K. Kim & Alan G. Isaac, 2017. "Firms’ Retention Behavior, Debt, and Macroeconomic Dynamics," Working Papers 2017_04, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:mab:wpaper:2017_04
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eckhard Hein, 2007. "Interest Rate, Debt, Distribution And Capital Accumulation In A Post-Kaleckian Model," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 310-339, May.
    2. Alan G. Isaac & Yun K. Kim, 2013. "Consumer and Corporate Debt: A Neo- K aleckian Synthesis," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(2), pages 244-271, May.
    3. Setterfield, Mark & Kim, Yun K., 2016. "Debt servicing, aggregate consumption, and growth," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 22-33.
    4. Hiroshi Nishi, 2012. "Household Debt, Dynamic Stability, and Change in Demand Creation Patterns," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 607-622, October.
    5. Gilberto Tadeu Lima & Antonio J. A. Meirelles, 2007. "Macrodynamics of debt regimes, financial instability and growth," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(4), pages 563-580, July.
    6. Hiroaki Sasaki & Shinya Fujita, 2012. "The Importance Of The Retention Ratio In A Kaleckian Model With Debt Accumulation," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(3), pages 417-428, July.
    7. Chirinko, Robert S. & Fazzari, Steven M. & Meyer, Andrew P., 1999. "How responsive is business capital formation to its user cost?: An exploration with micro data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 53-80, October.
    8. Eckhard Hein, 2006. "Interest, Debt and Capital Accumulation—A Kaleckian Approach," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 337-352.
    9. Cynamon Barry Z. & Fazzari Steven M., 2008. "Household Debt in the Consumer Age: Source of Growth--Risk of Collapse," Capitalism and Society, De Gruyter, vol. 3(2), pages 1-32, October.
    10. Eckhard Hein, 2012. "Finance-dominated capitalism, re-distribution, household debt and financial fragility in a Kaleckian distribution and growth model," PSL Quarterly Review, Economia civile, vol. 65(260), pages 11-51.
    11. Steven M. Fazzari & R. Glenn Hubbard & Bruce C. Petersen, 1988. "Financing Constraints and Corporate Investment," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(1), pages 141-206.
    12. Yun K. Kim & Mark Setterfield & Yuan Mei, 2014. "A theory of aggregate consumption," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 31-49, April.
    13. Marc Lavoie, 1995. "Interest Rates In Post-Keynesian Models Of Growth And Distribution," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 146-177, June.
    14. Amitava Krishna Dutt, 2006. "Maturity, Stagnation And Consumer Debt: A Steindlian Approach," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(3), pages 339-364, July.
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    17. repec:taf:revpoe:v:28:y:2016:i:1:p:45-63 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Mark Setterfield & Yun K. Kim & Jeremy Rees, 2016. "Inequality, Debt Servicing and the Sustainability of Steady State Growth," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(1), pages 45-63, January.
    19. Peter Skott & Soon Ryoo, 2008. "Macroeconomic implications of financialisation," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(6), pages 827-862, November.
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    24. Mark Setterfield & Yun K. Kim, 2017. "Household borrowing and the possibility of ‘consumption-driven, profit-led growth’," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 5(1), pages 43-60, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumer debt; corporate debt; endogenous retention ratio; stability;

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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