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Consumer and Corporate Debt: A Neo-Kaleckian Synthesis

Author

Listed:
  • Yun Kim

    () (Department of Economics, Trinity College)

  • Alan Isaac

    () (Department of Economics, American University)

Abstract

Models of the macrodynamic impact of private debt tend to emphasize the role of corporate debt. Corporate leverage affects macroeconomic outcomes and can contribute to financial fragility. We show that consumer debt is also important. We include consumer as well as corporate debt in a stock-flow consistent neo-Kaleckian growth model and explore the macrodynamic ramifications. We find that consumer credit conditions influence effective demand, the profit rate, and economic growth. The inclusion of consumer debt as well as corporate debt in our model substantially alters the model's dynamics. We compare our short-run, transition, and long-run results to models containing a single type of debt. Some of our results confirm the results of simpler models. For example, we find that a surge in animal spirits is good for steady-state growth. We show that consumer borrowing can also help to sustain aggregate demand, that looser consumer credit conditions have a steady-state growth effect, and that demand augmenting changes can enhance system stability. In this sense, looser consumer credit conditions are good for macroeconomic stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Yun Kim & Alan Isaac, 2011. "Consumer and Corporate Debt: A Neo-Kaleckian Synthesis," Working Papers 1108, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tri:wpaper:1108
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sebastien Charles, 2008. "A Post-Keynesian Model of Accumulation with a Minskyan Financial Structure," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 319-331.
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    3. Chirinko, Robert S. & Fazzari, Steven M. & Meyer, Andrew P., 1999. "How responsive is business capital formation to its user cost?: An exploration with micro data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 53-80, October.
    4. Eckhard Hein, 2006. "Interest, Debt and Capital Accumulation—A Kaleckian Approach," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 337-352.
    5. Steven M. Fazzari & R. Glenn Hubbard & Bruce C. Petersen, 1988. "Financing Constraints and Corporate Investment," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(1), pages 141-206.
    6. Marc Lavoie, 1995. "Interest Rates In Post-Keynesian Models Of Growth And Distribution," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 146-177, June.
    7. Amitava Krishna Dutt, 2006. "Maturity, Stagnation And Consumer Debt: A Steindlian Approach," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(3), pages 339-364, July.
    8. Antonio Meirelles & Gilberto Lima, 2006. "Debt, financial fragility, and economic growth: a Post Keynesian macromodel," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(1), pages 93-115.
    9. Dutt, Amitava Krishna, 1984. "Stagnation, Income Distribution and Monopoly Power," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(1), pages 25-40, March.
    10. Sébastien Charles, 2008. "Corporate debt, variable retention rate and the appearance of financial fragility," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(5), pages 781-795, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yun K. Kim & Gilberto Tadeu Lima & Mark Setterfield, 2017. "Political Aspects of Household Debt," Working Papers 1724, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
    2. repec:elg:ejeepi:v:14:y:2017:i:2:p131-172 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Soon Ryoo, 2016. "Household debt and housing bubbles: a Minskian approach to boom-bust cycles," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(5), pages 971-1006, December.
    4. Soon Ryoo & Yun K. Kim, 2014. "Income Distribution, Consumer Debt and Keeping up with the Joneses," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(4), pages 585-618, November.
    5. Engelbert Stockhammer & Rafael Wildauer, 2016. "Debt-driven growth? Wealth, distribution and demand in OECD countries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(6), pages 1609-1634.
    6. Yun K. Kim & Alan G. Isaac, 2017. "Firms’ Retention Behavior, Debt, and Macroeconomic Dynamics," Working Papers 2017_04, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
    7. Hein, Eckhard & Dodig, Nina, 2014. "Financialisation, distribution, growth and crises: Long-run tendencies," IPE Working Papers 35/2014, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
    8. Eckhard Hein, 2017. "Post-Keynesian macroeconomics since the mid 1990s: main developments," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 14(2), pages 131-172, September.
    9. Robert A. Blecker, 2015. "Wage-led Versus Profit-led Demand Regimes: The Long and Short of It," Working Papers 2015-05, American University, Department of Economics.
    10. Yun Kim & Soon Ryoo, 2013. "Income Distribution, Consumer Debt, and Keeping Up with the Joneses: a Kaldor-Minsky-Veblen Model," Working Papers 1302, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
    11. Greg Hannsgen & Tai Young-Taft, 2015. "Inside Money in a Kaldor-Kalecki-Steindl Fiscal Policy Model: The Unit of Account, Inflation, Leverage, and Financial Fragility," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_839, Levy Economics Institute.
    12. Soon Ryoo, 2013. "Minsky cycles in Keynesian models of growth and distribution," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 1(1), pages 37-60, January.
    13. Yun K. Kim, 2016. "Macroeconomic effects of household debt: an empirical analysis," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 4(2), pages 127-150, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumer debt; corporate debt; leverage; growth; stability;

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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