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A Theory of Aggregate Consumption

Author

Listed:
  • Yun Kim

    () (Department of Economics, Trinity College)

  • Mark Setterfield

    () (Department of Economics, Trinity College)

  • Yuan Mei

    () (Department of Economics, University of Chicago)

Abstract

We develop a Keynesian model of aggregate consumption. Our theory emphasizes the importance of the relative income hypothesis and debt-finance for understanding household consumption behavior. It is shown that particular importance attaches to how net debtor households service their debts, and that the treatment of debt servicing commitments as a substitute for savings by these households creates the potential for “sudden stops” in consumption spending (and hence aggregate demand). The implications for aggregate consumption of changes in the distribution of income and changes in the composition of employment are also explored.

Suggested Citation

  • Yun Kim & Mark Setterfield & Yuan Mei, 2013. "A Theory of Aggregate Consumption," Working Papers 1301, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tri:wpaper:1301
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Setterfield, Mark & Kim, Yun K., 2016. "Debt servicing, aggregate consumption, and growth," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 22-33.
    2. Detzer, Daniel, 2016. "Financialisation, debt and inequality: Scenarios based on a stock flow consistent model," IPE Working Papers 64/2016, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
    3. Mark Setterfield & Yun K. Kim & Jeremy Rees, 2016. "Inequality, Debt Servicing and the Sustainability of Steady State Growth," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(1), pages 45-63, January.
    4. Yun K. Kim & Gilberto Tadeu Lima & Mark Setterfield, 2017. "Political Aspects of Household Debt," Working Papers 1724, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
    5. Daniel Detzer, 2017. "Financialisation, Debt and Inequality: Export-led Mercantilist and Debt-led Private Demand Boom Economies in a Stock-flow consistent Model," Working Papers 2016-03, Universita' di Cassino, Dipartimento di Economia e Giurisprudenza.
    6. Robert A. Blecker, 2016. "Wage-led versus profit-led demand regimes: the long and the short of it," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 4(4), pages 373-390, October.
    7. Jan Behringer & Till van Treeck, 2013. "Income distribution and current account: A sectoral perspective," IMK Working Paper 125-2013, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    8. Mark Setterfield, 2014. "Using Interest Rates as the Instrument of Monetary Policy: Beware Real effects, Positive Feedbacks, and Discontinuities," Ensayos Económicos, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department, vol. 1(70), pages 7-22, June.
    9. Yun K. Kim & Alan G. Isaac, 2017. "Firms’ Retention Behavior, Debt, and Macroeconomic Dynamics," Working Papers 2017_04, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
    10. Hein, Eckhard, 2016. "Post-Keynesian macroeconomics since the mid-1990s: Main developments," IPE Working Papers 75/2016, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
    11. Hafizah Hammad Ahmad Khan & Hussin Abdullah & Shamzaeffa Samsudin, 2016. "The Linkages between Household Consumption and Household Debt Composition in Malaysia," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(4), pages 1354-1359.
    12. Yun K. Kim, 2016. "Macroeconomic effects of household debt: an empirical analysis," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 4(2), pages 127-150, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumption; household borrowing; household debt; relative income hypothesis;

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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