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Behavioral Foundations for the Keynesian Consumption Function

Listed author(s):
  • Fabio D'Orlando

    (University of Cassino)

  • Eleonora Sanfilippo

    (University of Cassino)

This paper has two main goals. The first is to show that behavioral rather than maximizing principles emerge from textual analysis as the microeconomic foundations for Keynes’s Consumption Theory; the second goal is to demonstrate that it is possible to ground a Keynesian-type aggregate Consumption function on the basis of (some of) the principles underlying contemporary behavioral models

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Paper provided by Universita' di Cassino, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche in its series Working Papers with number 2008-05.

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Length: 15 pages
Date of creation: May 2008
Handle: RePEc:css:wpaper:2008-05
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche Via S. Angelo Loc. Folcara 03043 Cassino (FR) - Italy

Phone: +3907762994734
Fax: +3907762994834
Web page: http://www.eco-giu.uniclam.it/Dipartimento/Info
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