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Incentivos al Ahorro Personal: Lecciones de la Economía del Comportamiento

  • Andrea Repetto


La teoría económica supone que los individuos maximizan racionalmente un set de preferencias que es coherente y estable, marco que ha sido aplicado con bastante éxito a un sinnúmero de problemas económicos. Sin embargo, algunos de los axiomas utilizados por el modelo están reñidos con los supuestos utilizados en otras disciplinas que estudian el comportamiento humano y con la evidencia experimental. Este trabajo discute políticas de promoción del ahorro personal desde dos perspectivas. La primera supone que las personas son perfectamente racionales y que aprovechan todos los incentivos existentes. La otra supone que los individuos tienen dificultad para comportarse como el homo economicus de los modelos, ya sea porque les es complejo determinar qué es óptimo para cada etapa de su vida o porque tienen problemas de auto-control. En base a dos modelos no tradicionales de consumo intertemporal se demuestra que es posible promover el ahorro de los hogares a través de instrumentos automáticos, ilíquidos y que premian el ahorro en el corto y no en el largo plazo.

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Paper provided by Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile in its series Documentos de Trabajo with number 103.

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Date of creation: 2001
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Handle: RePEc:edj:ceauch:103
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