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Educational Achievement and the Allocation of School Resources

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  • Deborah A. Cobb-Clark
  • Nikhil Jha

Abstract

type="main" xml:lang="en"> The debate on school resources and educational outcomes has focused almost exclusively on spending levels. We extend this by analysing the relationship between student achievement and schools' budget allocations using panel data. Per-pupil expenditure has no apparent link to improvement in students' standardised test scores. However, the allocation of the budget matters for student achievement in some grades. Ancillary teaching staff are linked to faster growth in numeracy and literacy in primary- and middle-schools. Spending on experienced teachers is also important for writing achievement in the primary-school years. On the whole, we find very little evidence of inefficient spending patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Nikhil Jha, 2016. "Educational Achievement and the Allocation of School Resources," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(3), pages 251-271, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:49:y:2016:i:3:p:251-271
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    Cited by:

    1. Miquel Pellicer & Patrizio Piraino, 2015. "The effect of non-personnel resources on educational outcomes: Evidence from South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 144, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    2. Marchand, Joseph & Weber, Jeremy, 2015. "The Labor Market and School Finance Effects of the Texas Shale Boom on Teacher Quality and Student Achievement," Working Papers 2015-15, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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