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Expenditure Inequality in Indonesia, 2008–2010: A Spatial Decomposition Analysis and the Role of Education

Author

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  • Mitsuhiro Hayashi
  • Mitsuhiko Kataoka
  • Takahiro Akita

Abstract

type="main"> Based on the 2008–2010 Susenas panel data, this study examines expenditure inequality from spatial perspectives in Indonesia, using three decomposition methods: (i) a conventional Theil index decomposition; (ii) an alternative Theil index decomposition proposed by Elbers et al. (2008); and (iii) the Blinder−Oaxaca decomposition. Our results show that overall inequality in per capita expenditure increases between 2008 and 2010, which coincides with a rising trend in the official Gini coefficient. The contribution of inequality within urban and rural areas to total inequality is larger than that of inequality between urban and rural areas. Looking within urban and rural areas, urban inequality is significantly higher than rural inequality. Java-Bali in particular records very high urban inequality. Overall, urban inequality increases, urban–rural inequality remains stable, rural inequality decreases, and inequality at the national level increases. Although urban–rural inequality has a relatively low share in overall inequality, the share is not small enough to ignore its impact. Furthermore, when using the alternative decomposition method, the contribution of urban–rural inequality increases substantially. The present study also found that educational differences appear to have played an important role in expenditure inequality within urban areas and between urban and rural areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Mitsuhiro Hayashi & Mitsuhiko Kataoka & Takahiro Akita, 2014. "Expenditure Inequality in Indonesia, 2008–2010: A Spatial Decomposition Analysis and the Role of Education," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 389-411, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:asiaec:v:28:y:2014:i:4:p:389-411
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mitsuhiko Kataoka, 2016. "Interprovincial efficiency differentials in Indonesia's pre-and post-crisis economy," ERSA conference papers ersa16p412, European Regional Science Association.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:559-:d:132892 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:bracre:v:50:y:2018:i:5:p:463-480 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Takahiro Akita, 2017. "Educational Expansion and the Role of Education in Expenditure Inequality in Indonesia Since the 1997 Financial Crisis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 130(3), pages 1165-1186, February.
    5. repec:spr:soinre:v:138:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1694-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Takahiro Akita & Sachiko Miyata, 2018. "Spatial Inequalities in Indonesia, 1996–2010: A Hierarchical Decomposition Analysis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 138(3), pages 829-852, August.
    7. Mitsuhiko Kataoka, 2015. "Interprovincial differences in the endowment and utilization in labour force by educational attainment in Indonesia's post-crisis economy," ERSA conference papers ersa15p878, European Regional Science Association.
    8. repec:eee:asieco:v:57:y:2018:i:c:p:1-12 is not listed on IDEAS

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