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Job Search and Migration in Peru

  • Sabates, Ricardo
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    Most of the empirical literature on migration in the context of developing countries focuses on migration from rural to urban areas. This paper aims to extend the analysis by incorporating rural-rural migration in Peru for the year of 1997. Based on a theoretical result, three empirical factors are explored in the paper using data from the Peruvian Living Standard Measurement Survey. First, wage differentials from different jobs shape the probabilities of rural-urban and rural-rural migration in distinct ways. Second, as compared with individuals that migrate to rural areas, urban migrants accumulate private wealth – in the form of durable goods - and acquire more public services. Finally, migrants are equally likely to move to a rural or an urban district as long as these are located in richer provinces.

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    Article provided by Mid-Continent Regional Science Association in its journal Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:132177
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    1. Thomas Krichel & Paul Levine, 1997. "The Welfare Economics of Rural to Urban Migration: The Harris-Todaro Model Revisited," School of Economics Discussion Papers 9702, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    2. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 1995. "Resisting Migration: Wage Rigidity and Income Distribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 312-16, May.
    3. Newey, Whitney K., 1987. "Efficient estimation of limited dependent variable models with endogenous explanatory variables," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 231-250, November.
    4. Leach, John, 1996. "Training, migration, and regional income disparities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 429-443, September.
    5. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-42, March.
    6. Pessino, Carola, 1991. "Sequential migration theory and evidence from Peru," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 55-87, July.
    7. Paul Krugman, 1996. "Urban Concentration: The Role of Increasing Returns and Transport Costs," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 19(1-2), pages 5-30, April.
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