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On the Road: Marriage and Mobility in Malaysia

Author

Listed:
  • James P. Smith

    (RAND)

  • Duncan Thomas

    (RAND)

Abstract

Migration choices of husbands and wives in a dynamic and developing country are studied in the context of an economic model of the household. Data are drawn from the second wave of the Malaysia Family Life Survey. Exploiting the retrospective histories, we compare moves that take place before marriage with those made during the marriage; among the latter, moves that are made with the spouse are distinguished from those made alone. The evidence indicates that male mobility is primarily economic in motivation and related to labor market factors. Moves by women, however, seem to be more closely related to fertility or family considerations. Migration is apparently not simply an individual decision; the attributes of the spouse are an important influence on mobility, albeit in an asymmetric manner. Moving toward a broader definition of the household, we find the characteristics of the parents, parents-in-law, and also the (relative) age and gender of siblings all influence mobility in a rich, if complex, way.

Suggested Citation

  • James P. Smith & Duncan Thomas, 2004. "On the Road: Marriage and Mobility in Malaysia," Labor and Demography 0403020, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0403020
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 27. Journal of Human Resources, Volume 33, Number 4, Fall 1998, pp. 805-832
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    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/lab/papers/0403/0403020.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stark, Oded & Levhari, David, 1982. "On Migration and Risk in LDCs," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 191-196, October.
    2. McFadden, Daniel & Ruud, Paul A, 1994. "Estimation by Simulation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(4), pages 591-608, November.
    3. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Stark, Oded, 1989. "Consumption Smoothing, Migration, and Marriage: Evidence from Rural India," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 905-926, August.
    4. McCall, B P & McCall, J J, 1987. "A Sequential Study of Migration and Job Search," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(4), pages 452-476, October.
    5. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
    6. Pessino, Carola, 1991. "Sequential migration theory and evidence from Peru," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 55-87, July.
    7. Stark, Oded, 1988. "On Marriage and Migration," MPRA Paper 21672, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. David SAHN & Catalina HERRERA, 2013. "Determinants of Internal Migration among Senegalese Youth," Working Papers 201308, CERDI.
    2. LaFave, Daniel & Thomas, Duncan, 2017. "Extended families and child well-being," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 52-65.
    3. Holly E. Reed & Catherine S. Andrzejewski & Michael J. White, 2010. "Men’s and women’s migration in coastal Ghana," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(25), pages 771-812, April.
    4. Duncan Thomas & Elizabeth Frankenberg & James P. Smith, 2001. "Lost but Not Forgotten: Attrition and Follow-up in the Indonesia Family Life Survey," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(3), pages 556-592.
    5. Nizam Khan & Andrew D. Foster, 1994. "Equilibrating the Marriage Market in a Rapidly Growing Population: Evidence from Rural Bangladesh," Home Pages _080, University of Pennsylvania.
    6. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth S. & Brown, Lynn R. & Feldstein, Hilary Sims & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 1997. "Gender, property rights, and natural resources," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(8), pages 1303-1315, August.
    7. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & McNiven, Scott, 2007. "Migration and the Rural-Urban Continuum: Evidence from Bukidnon, Philippines," Philippine Journal of Development PJD 2006 Vol. XXXIII Nos., Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    8. repec:phd:pjdevt:pjd_2006_vol._xxxiii_nos._1and2-a is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & McNiven, Scott, 2005. "Migration and the rural-urban continuum: Evidence from the Rural Philippines," FCND discussion papers 197, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Gautier, Pieter A. & Svarer, Michael & Teulings, Coen N., 2010. "Marriage and the city: Search frictions and sorting of singles," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 206-218, March.

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    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics

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