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Information Quality, Technology Depreciation, And Bt Cotton Adoption In The Southeast

Author

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  • Marra, Michele C.
  • Hubbell, Bryan J.
  • Carlson, Gerald A.

Abstract

In 1996, Bt cotton became one of the first genetically engineered crops to be available commercially. This study focuses on the various sources and quality of information about Bt cotton profitability available to farmers in the Southeast and assesses the relative importance of such information in the farmers' adoption decisions. A model of the individual decision to adopt is developed to incorporate two recent theories of the role of information quality (the "effective information" hypothesis and the "popularity" hypothesis) as well as the effect of current technology depreciation. The data show some support for all three factors as determinants of adoption.

Suggested Citation

  • Marra, Michele C. & Hubbell, Bryan J. & Carlson, Gerald A., 2001. "Information Quality, Technology Depreciation, And Bt Cotton Adoption In The Southeast," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(1), pages 1-18, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:31158
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.31158
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/31158/files/26010158.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lindner, R. & Fischer, A. & Pardey, P., 1979. "The time to adoption," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 187-190.
    2. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1995. "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1176-1209, December.
    3. Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1983. "Stochastic Structure, Farm Size and Technology Adoption in Developing Agriculture," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(2), pages 307-328, July.
    4. Feder, Gershon & O'Mara, Gerald T, 1981. "Farm Size and the Diffusion of Green Revolution Technology," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 59-76, October.
    5. Derek Byerlee & Edward Souza, 1997. "Wheat Rusts and the Costs of Genetic Diversity in the Punjab of Pakistan," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(3), pages 726-737.
    6. A.J. Fischer & A.J. Arnold & M. Gibbs, 1996. "Information and the Speed of Innovation Adoption," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(4), pages 1073-1081.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Oehmke, James F. & Wolf, Christopher A., 2004. "Is Monsanto Leaving Money on the Table? Monopoly Pricing and Bt Cotton Value with Heterogeneous Adopters," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1-14, December.
    2. Krishna, Vijesh V. & Qaim, Matin, 2007. "Estimating the adoption of Bt eggplant in India: Who Benefits from public-private partnership?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5-6), pages 523-543.
    3. Areal, Francisco J. & Riesgo, Laura & Gomez-Barbero, Manuel & Rodriguez-Cerezo, Emilio, 2011. "Adoption of GMHT Crops: Coexistence Policy Consequences in the European Union," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114227, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Alexandre Gori Maia & José Maria Jardim Da Silveira, 2014. "Farmers’ Preferences For Genetically Modified Corn In Brazil: The Contribution Of Latent Attitudes," Anais do XLI Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 41st Brazilian Economics Meeting] 196, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    5. Alexander, Corinne E., 2002. "Role Of Information In The Decision To Adopt Genetically Modified Seed," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19862, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Gillespie, Jeffrey M. & Davis, Christopher G. & Rahelizatovo, Noro C., 2004. "Factors Influencing the Adoption of Breeding Technologies in U.S. Hog Production," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(1), pages 35-47, April.
    7. Llewellyn, Rick S. & Lindner, Robert K. & Pannell, David J. & Powles, Stephen B., 2003. "Effective information and the influence of an extension event on perceptions and adoption," 2003 Conference (47th), February 12-14, 2003, Fremantle, Australia 57911, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    8. Suntornpithug, Pasu & Kalaitzandonakes, Nicholas G., 2009. "Understanding the Adoption of Cotton Biotechnologies in the US: Firm Level Evidence," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 10(1), pages 1-17.
    9. Xu, Pei & Wang, Zhigang, 2012. "Factors Affect Chinese Producers' Adoption of a New Production Technology: Survey Results from Chinese Fruits Producers," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 13(2), pages 1-16.
    10. Marra, Michele & Pannell, David J. & Abadi Ghadim, Amir, 2003. "The economics of risk, uncertainty and learning in the adoption of new agricultural technologies: where are we on the learning curve?," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 75(2-3), pages 215-234.
    11. Sydorovych, Olha & Marra, Michele C., 2005. "Towards a Generalizable Measure of the Value of a Change in Pesticide Use," 2005 Annual Meeting, February 5-9, 2005, Little Rock, Arkansas 35513, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    12. Useche, Pilar & Barham, Bradford & Foltz, Jeremy, 2006. "A Trait Specific Model of GM Crop Adoption by Minnesota and Wisconsin Corn Farmers," Working Papers 201525, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Food System Research Group.
    13. Breustedt, Gunnar & Muller-Scheessel, Jorg & Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe, 2008. "Forecasting the Adoption of GM Oilseed Rape: Evidence from a Discrete Choice Experiment," 82nd Annual Conference, March 31 - April 2, 2008, Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, UK 36771, Agricultural Economics Society.
    14. Conor Keelan & Fiona Thorne & Paul Flanagan & Carol Newman & Ewen Mullins, 2008. "Adoption of GM Technology at Farm Level," Working Papers 0810, Rural Economy and Development Programme,Teagasc.
    15. Nadolnyak, Denis A. & Sheldon, Ian M., 2002. "A Model of Diffusion of Genetically Modified Crop Technology in Concentrated Agricultural Processing Markets - The Case of Soybeans," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24872, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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    Crop Production/Industries;

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