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Effective information and the influence of an extension event on perceptions and adoption

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  • Llewellyn, Rick S.
  • Lindner, Robert K.
  • Pannell, David J.
  • Powles, Stephen B.

Abstract

Perceptions are known to play an important role in the innovation adoption decision. Once influential perceptions have been identified, there is the potential for information to influence adoption by changing these perceptions. In this paper, the influence of an extension workshop targeting grain growers’ perceptions known to be associated with the adoption of integrated weed management and herbicide resistance management has been measured using regression analysis. Consistent with a Bayesian learning framework, the greatest influence on grower perceptions and intended adoption behaviour was observed where information could be delivered with a high degree of certainty and validity.

Suggested Citation

  • Llewellyn, Rick S. & Lindner, Robert K. & Pannell, David J. & Powles, Stephen B., 2003. "Effective information and the influence of an extension event on perceptions and adoption," 2003 Conference (47th), February 12-14, 2003, Fremantle, Australia 57911, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare03:57911
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John W. Cary & Roger L. Wilkinson, 1997. "Perceived Profitability And Farmers' Conservation Behaviour," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 13-21.
    2. Feather, Peter M. & Amacher, Gregory S., 1994. "Role of information in the adoption of best management practices for water quality improvement," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 11(2-3), December.
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    5. Lindner, R. & Fischer, A. & Pardey, P., 1979. "The time to adoption," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 187-190.
    6. Lindner, Robert K. & Pardey, Philip G. & Jarrett, Frank G., 1982. "Distance To Information Source And The Time Lag To Early Adoption Of Trace Element Fertilisers," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 26(02), August.
    7. James C. Cox, 1998. "Quantifying the Effects of Sow-Herd Management Information Systems on Farmers' Decision Making Using Experimental Economics," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(4), pages 821-829.
    8. Lisa A. Cameron, 1999. "The Importance of Learning in the Adoption of High-Yielding Variety Seeds," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(1), pages 83-94.
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    12. Gershon Feder & Gerald T. O'Mara, 1982. "On Information and Innovation Diffusion: A Bayesian Approach," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 64(1), pages 145-147.
    13. Marra, Michele C. & Hubbell, Bryan J. & Carlson, Gerald A., 2001. "Information Quality, Technology Depreciation, And Bt Cotton Adoption In The Southeast," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(01), July.
    14. Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Baidu-Forson, Jojo, 1995. "Farmers' perceptions and adoption of new agricultural technology: evidence from analysis in Burkina Faso and Guinea, West Africa," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 1-9, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pannell, David J. & Stewart, Vanessa & Bennett, Anne & Monjardino, Marta & Schmidt, Carmel & Powles, Stephen B., 2004. "RIM: a bioeconomic model for integrated weed management of Lolium rigidum in Western Australia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 79(3), pages 305-325, March.

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