IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/ijfaec/208852.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Second Round Effects And Pass-Through Of Food Prices To Inflation In Kenya

Author

Listed:
  • Misati, Roseline Nyakerario
  • Munene, Olive

Abstract

In the recent past, the Kenyan economy experienced persistent inflationary pressures, partly attributed to food price spikes. However, the quantitative role of food prices in inflation is not well understood or formally empirically analyzed in Kenya yet food occupies a weight of 36 percent in the consumer price index and contributes a monthly average of over 40 percent to overall inflation. Based on monthly data covering the period 1997-2012, this paper attempts to fill this gap by examining the relationship between food prices and inflation. The study used gap models and Phillips curve approaches to estimate the passthrough effects of food prices to both overall inflation and non-food non-fuel inflation. Based on gap models, the results confirm presence of second round effects from food prices to inflation while estimations of the Phillips curve suggest a domestic food price pass-through of 0.49 to overall inflation and 0.38 to non-food non-fuel inflation. The world food prices pass-through to overall inflation and non-food non-fuel inflation are estimated at 0.09 and 0.08, respectively. Thus this paper recommends usage of headline inflation to estimate trend inflation, enhanced communication to mitigate second round effects and that while monetary policy is very critical in anchoring inflationary expectations, there is mutual gain from a supportive fiscal policy in addressing supply side shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Misati, Roseline Nyakerario & Munene, Olive, 2015. "Second Round Effects And Pass-Through Of Food Prices To Inflation In Kenya," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 3(3), pages 1-13, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ijfaec:208852
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.208852
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/208852/files/vol3.no3.pp75.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.22004/ag.econ.208852?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jose de Gregorio & Oscar Landerretche & Christopher Neilson, 2007. "Another Pass-Through Bites the Dust? Oil Prices and Inflation," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Spring 20), pages 155-208, January.
    2. Al-Shawarby, Sherine & Selim, Hoda, 2012. "Are international food price spikes the source of Egypt's high inflation ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6177, The World Bank.
    3. Gianluigi Ferrucci & Rebeca Jiménez-Rodríguez & Luca Onorantea, 2012. "Food Price Pass-Through in the Euro Area: Non-Linearities and the Role of the Common Agricultural Policy," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 8(1), pages 179-218, March.
    4. Pourroy, Marc & Carton, Benjamin & Coulibaly, Dramane, 2016. "Food prices and inflation targeting in emerging economies," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 108-140.
    5. Thérèse Laflèche & Jamie Armour, 2006. "Evaluating Measures of Core Inflation," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2006(Summer), pages 19-29.
    6. Mr. Dick Durevall & Njuguna S. Ndung'u, 1999. "A Dynamic Model of Inflation for Kenya, 1974–1996," IMF Working Papers 1999/097, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Elena I. Ianchovichina & Josef L. Loening & Christina A. Wood, 2014. "How Vulnerable are Arab Countries to Global Food Price Shocks?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(9), pages 1302-1319, September.
    8. Tiff Macklem, 2001. "A New Measure of Core Inflation," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2001(Autumn), pages 3-12.
    9. Fabio Rumler, 2012. "The Pass-Through of Commodity Prices to Consumer Prices of Selected Products," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 92-104.
    10. Mija, Simion & Slobozian, Dorin & Cuhal, Radu & Stratan, Alexandru, 2013. "How Core Inflation Reacts to the Second Round Effects," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(1), pages 98-118, March.
    11. Cogley, Timothy, 2002. "A Simple Adaptive Measure of Core Inflation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(1), pages 94-113, February.
    12. Juthathip Jongwanich & Donghyun Park, 2011. "Inflation in developing Asia: pass‐through from global food and oil price shocks," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 25(1), pages 79-92, May.
    13. Mr. James P Walsh, 2011. "Reconsidering the Role of Food Prices in Inflation," IMF Working Papers 2011/071, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Todd E. Clark, 2001. "Comparing measures of core inflation," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 86(Q II), pages 5-31.
    15. Mr. Rafael A Portillo & Michal Andrle & Mr. Jan Vlcek & Mr. R. Armando Morales & Mr. Andrew Berg, 2013. "Forecasting and Monetary Policy Analysis in Low-Income Countries: Food and non-Food Inflation in Kenya," IMF Working Papers 2013/061, International Monetary Fund.
    16. Munir Jalil & Esteban Tamayo, 2011. "Pass-through of International Food Prices to Domestic Inflation During and After the Great Recession: Evidence from a Set of Latin American Economies," Revista Desarrollo y Sociedad, Universidad de los Andes – Facultad de Economía – CEDE, June.
    17. Durevall, Dick & Loening, Josef L. & Ayalew Birru, Yohannes, 2013. "Inflation dynamics and food prices in Ethiopia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 89-106.
    18. A.F.M. Kamrul Hassan & Ruhul A. Salim, 2011. "Is there any Link Between Commodity Price and Monetary Policy? Evidence from Australia," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 205-216, December.
    19. Eduardo Lora & Andrew Powell & Pilar Tavella, 2011. "How Will the Food Price Shock Affect Inflation in Latin America and the Caribbean?," Research Department Publications 4719, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    20. Logan Rangasamy, 2011. "Food Inflation In South Africa: Some Implications For Economic Policy," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 79(2), pages 184-201, June.
    21. Christopher Adam & David Kwimbere & Wilfred Mbowe & Stephen O’Connell, 2012. "Working Paper 163 - Food Prices and Inflation in Tanzania," Working Paper Series 441, African Development Bank.
    22. Stephen G Cecchetti & Richhild Moessner, 2008. "Commodity prices and inflation dynamics," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    23. International Monetary Fund, 2012. "Global Food Price Inflation and Policy Responses in Central Asia," IMF Working Papers 2012/086, International Monetary Fund.
    24. Loening, Josef L., 2011. "Middle East and North Africa Countries' Vulnerability to Commodity Price Increases," MPRA Paper 33393, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gil-Alana, Luis A. & Mudida, Robert, 2017. "CPI and inflation in Kenya. Structural breaks, non-linearities and dependence," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 72-79.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Ginn, William & Pourroy, Marc, 2020. "Should a central bank react to food inflation? Evidence from an estimated model for Chile," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 221-234.
    2. Gelos, Gaston & Ustyugova, Yulia, 2017. "Inflation responses to commodity price shocks – How and why do countries differ?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 28-47.
    3. Aron, Janine & Muellbauer, John & Sebudde, Rachel, 2015. "Inflation forecasting models for Uganda: is mobile money relevant?," CEPR Discussion Papers 10739, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Jamie Armour, 2006. "An Evaluation of Core Inflation Measures," Staff Working Papers 06-10, Bank of Canada.
    5. Tierney, Heather L.R., 2011. "Real-time data revisions and the PCE measure of inflation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 1763-1773, July.
    6. Michael Pedersen, 2015. "Propagation of Shocks to Food and Energy Prices: A Cross-Country Analysis," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 65(4), pages 272-289, August.
    7. Bekkers, Eddy & Brockmeier, Martina & Francois, Joseph & Yang, Fan, 2017. "Local Food Prices and International Price Transmission," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 216-230.
    8. Atsushi Sekine & Takayuki Tsuruga, 2018. "Effects of commodity price shocks on inflation: a cross-country analysis," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(4), pages 1108-1135.
    9. Michael Pedersen, 2011. "Propagation of Shocks to Food and Energy Prices: an International Comparison," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 648, Central Bank of Chile.
    10. Belke, Ansgar & Dreger, Christian, 2013. "The Transmission of Oil and Food Prices to Consumer Prices – Evidence for the MENA Countries," Ruhr Economic Papers 448, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    11. Chrigui Zouhair & Boujelbene Younes, 2009. "The Opportunities for Adopting Inflation Targeting in Tunisia: a Cointegration Study and Transmission Channels of Monetary Policy," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 16(3), pages 671-692, October.
    12. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2016. "Core Inflation and Trend Inflation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(4), pages 770-784, October.
    13. Hatab, Assem Abu & Hess, Sebastian, 2021. ""Feed the Mouth, the Eye Ashamed": Have Food Prices Triggered Social Unrest in Egypt?," 2021 Conference, August 17-31, 2021, Virtual 315082, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    14. Ansgar Belke & Christian Dreger, 2015. "The transmission of oil and food prices to consumer prices," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 143-161, March.
    15. Rafael Portillo & Luis-Felipe Zanna & Stephen O’Connell & Richard Peck, 2016. "Implications of food subsistence for monetary policy and inflation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(3), pages 782-810.
    16. Priyanka Sahu, 2021. "A Study on the Dynamic Behaviour of Headline Versus Core Inflation: Evidence from India," Global Business Review, International Management Institute, vol. 22(6), pages 1574-1593, December.
    17. Arango-Thomas, Luis Eduardo & Chavarro-Sanchez, Ximena & González-Molano, Eliana Rocío, 2013. "Precios de bienes primarios e inflación en Colombia," Chapters, in: Rincón-Castro, Hernán & Velasco, Andrés M. (ed.), Flujos de capitales, choques externos y respuestas de política en países emergentes, chapter 12, pages 487-532, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    18. Mr. Emre Alper & Ali Uppal & Mr. Niko A Hobdari, 2016. "Food Inflation in Sub-Saharan Africa: Causes and Policy Implications," IMF Working Papers 2016/247, International Monetary Fund.
    19. Oguz Atuk & Mustafa Utku Ozmen, 2009. "Design and Evaluation of Core Inflation Measures for Turkey," Working Papers 0903, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
    20. Erten Bilge & Tuzcuoglu Kerem, 2018. "Output Effects of Global Food Commodity Shocks," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-18, June.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:ijfaec:208852. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/iiaaktr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: AgEcon Search (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/iiaaktr.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.