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Food Retailers' Pricing and Marketing Strategies, with Implications for Producers

  • Sexton, Richard J.
  • Xia, Tian
  • Li, Lan

This paper examines grocery retailers' ability to influence prices charged to consumers and paid to suppliers. We discuss how retailer market power manifests itself in terms of pricing and marketing strategies by setting forth and offering evidence in support of eight "stylized facts" of retailer pricing and brand decisions. We argue that little, if any, of this behavior can be explained by a model of a competitive, price-taking retailer, but that most of the indicated behavior was also inconsistent with traditional models of market power. Finally, we discuss the impacts of aspects of this retailer behavior on the upstream farm sector.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/10213
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Article provided by Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association in its journal Agricultural and Resource Economics Review.

Volume (Year): 35 (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 (October)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:10213
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.narea.org/
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  1. Mingxia Zhang & Richard J. Sexton, 2002. "Optimal Commodity Promotion when Downstream Markets are Imperfectly Competitive," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(2), pages 352-365.
  2. Mingxia Zhang, 1997. "The Effects of Imperfect Competition on the Size and Distribution of Research Benefits," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1252-1265.
  3. Daniel H. Pick & Jeffrey Karrenbrock & Hoy F. Carman, 1990. "Price asymmetry and marketing margin behavior: An example for California-Arizona citrus," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(1), pages 75-84.
  4. Mills, David E, 1995. "Why Retailers Sell Private Labels," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 509-28, Fall.
  5. Philippe Bontems & Sylvette Monier-Dilhan & Vincent Réquillart, 1999. "Strategic effects of private labels," Working Papers 156390, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France.
  6. Dimitri, Carolyn & Tegene, Abebayehu & Kaufman, Phillip R., 2003. "U.S. Fresh Produce Markets: Marketing Channels, Trade Practices, And Retail Pricing Behavior," Agricultural Economics Reports 33907, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  7. Elizabeth Powers & Nicholas Powers, 2001. "The Size and Frequency of Price Changes: Evidence from Grocery Stores," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 397-416, June.
  8. Azzeddine M. Azzam, 1999. "Asymmetry and Rigidity in Farm-Retail Price Transmission," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(3), pages 525-533.
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