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Greenhouse gases mitigation policies in the agriculture of Aragon, Spain

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  • Kahil, Mohamed Taher
  • Albiac, José

Abstract

Climate change is an important threat to human society. Agriculture is a source of greenhouse gases (GHG), but it also provides alternatives to confront climate change. The expansion of intensive agriculture around the world during recent decades has generated significant environmental damages from pollution emissions. The spatial distribution of emissions is important for the design of local abatement measures. This study makes an assessment of GHG emissions in an intensive agricultural area of Aragon (Spain), and then an economic optimization model is developed to analyze several GHG mitigation measures. The results indicate that adequate management of manure, emissions limits, and animal production restrictions are appropriate measures to abate pollution. Economic instruments such as input and emission taxes could be only ancillary measures to address nonpoint pollution problems. Suitable pollution abatement policies should be based on institutional instruments adapted to local conditions, and involve the cooperation of stakeholders.

Suggested Citation

  • Kahil, Mohamed Taher & Albiac, José, 2013. "Greenhouse gases mitigation policies in the agriculture of Aragon, Spain," Bio-based and Applied Economics Journal, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA), issue 1, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aieabj:149222
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/149222
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Berta Sánchez & Jorge Álvaro-Fuentes & Ruth Cunningham & Ana Iglesias, 2016. "Towards mitigation of greenhouse gases by small changes in farming practices: understanding local barriers in Spain," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 21(7), pages 995-1028, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    GHG emissions; Economic modelling; Mitigation policies; Effectiveness; Abatement costs; Agricultural and Food Policy; Environmental Economics and Policy; Q54; D78; C61;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis

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