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Marginal Abatement Cost Curves For Uk Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Author

Listed:
  • Moran, Dominic
  • MacLeod, Michael J.
  • Wall, Eileen
  • Eory, Vera
  • McVittie, Alistair
  • Barnes, Andrew Peter
  • Rees, Robert
  • Topp, Cairistiona
  • Moxey, Andrew

Abstract

This paper addresses the challenge of developing a ‘bottom-up’ marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) for greenhouse gas emissions from UK agriculture. A MACC illustrates the costs of specific crop, soil, and livestock abatement measures against a ‘‘business as usual’’ scenario. The results indicate that in 2022 under a specific policy scenario, around 5.38 MtCO2 equivalent (e) could be abated at negative or zero cost. A further 17% of agricultural GHG emissions (7.85 MtCO2e) could be abated at a lower unit cost than the UK Government’s 2022 shadow price of carbon (£34 (tCO2e)-1). The paper discusses a range of methodological hurdles that complicate cost-effectiveness appraisal of abatement in agriculture relative to other sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Moran, Dominic & MacLeod, Michael J. & Wall, Eileen & Eory, Vera & McVittie, Alistair & Barnes, Andrew Peter & Rees, Robert & Topp, Cairistiona & Moxey, Andrew, 2010. "Marginal Abatement Cost Curves For Uk Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Emissions," Proceedings Issues, 2010: Climate Change in World Agriculture: Mitigation, Adaptation, Trade and Food Security, June 2010, Stuttgart- Hohenheim, Germany 91399, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iatr10:91399
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    Cited by:

    1. Oswald Marinoni & Martijn Grieken, 2016. "ABATE: A New Tool to Produce Marginal Abatement Cost Curves," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 48(2), pages 367-377, August.
    2. repec:spr:masfgc:v:23:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11027-017-9737-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. B. Henderson & A. Falcucci & A. Mottet & L. Early & B. Werner & H. Steinfeld & P. Gerber, 2017. "Marginal costs of abating greenhouse gases in the global ruminant livestock sector," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 199-224, January.
    4. repec:eee:enepol:v:113:y:2018:i:c:p:306-319 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Martin-Ortega, Julia & Perni, Angel & Jackson-Blake, Leah & Balana, Bedru B. & Mckee, Annie & Dunn, Sarah & Helliwell, Rachel & Psaltopoulos, Demetris & Skuras, Dimitris & Cooksley, Susan & Slee, Bill, 2015. "A transdisciplinary approach to the economic analysis of the European Water Framework Directive," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 34-45.
    6. Glenk, Klaus & Eory, Vera & Colombo, Sergio & Barnes, Andrew, 2014. "Adoption of greenhouse gas mitigation in agriculture: An analysis of dairy farmers' perceptions and adoption behaviour," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 49-58.
    7. Doole, Graeme J. & Kingwell, Ross, 2015. "Efficient economic and environmental management of pastoral systems: Theory and application," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 73-84.
    8. Du, Limin & Hanley, Aoife & Wei, Chu, 2015. "Estimating the Marginal Abatement Cost Curve of CO2 Emissions in China: Provincial Panel Data Analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 217-229.
    9. Kragt, M.E. & Pannell, D.J. & McVittie, A. & Stott, A.W. & Vosough Ahmadi, B. & Wilson, P., 2016. "Improving interdisciplinary collaboration in bio-economic modelling for agricultural systems," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 217-224.
    10. Isabel Teichmann, 2014. "Technical Greenhouse-Gas Mitigation Potentials of Biochar Soil Incorporation in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1406, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    11. Blandford, David & Hodge, Ian D., 2012. "Adapting Agri-Environment Schemes for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation – Observations from U.K. and U.S. Experience," 86th Annual Conference, April 16-18, 2012, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 135517, Agricultural Economics Society.
    12. Doole, Graeme J., 2012. "Cost-effective policies for improving water quality by reducing nitrate emissions from diverse dairy farms: An abatement–cost perspective," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 10-20.
    13. Röder, Norbert & Henseler, Martin & Liebersbach, Horst & Kreins, Peter & Osterburg, Bernhard, 2014. "Evaluation of land use based greenhouse gas mitigation measures in Germany," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182674, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    14. Wettemann, Patrick Johannes Christopher & Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe, 2017. "An efficiency-based concept to assess potential cost and greenhouse gas savings on German dairy farms," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 27-37.
    15. Andrew Barnes & Luiza Toma, 2012. "A typology of dairy farmer perceptions towards climate change," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 112(2), pages 507-522, May.
    16. Isabel Teichmann, 2015. "An Economic Assessment of Soil Carbon Sequestration with Biochar in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1476, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    17. Minihan, Erin S. & Wu, Ziping, 2011. "The Potential Economic and Environmental Costs of GHG Mitigation Measures for Cattle Sectors in Northern Ireland," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108779, Agricultural Economics Society.
    18. Ludemann, Cameron I. & Byrne, Timothy J. & Sise, Judith A. & Amer, Peter R., 2012. "Selection indices offer potential for New Zealand sheep farmers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions per unit of product," International Journal of Agricultural Management, Institute of Agricultural Management;International Farm Management Association, vol. 1(4), July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; Marginal abatement costs; Agriculture; Environmental Economics and Policy; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy; Q52; Q 54; Q58;

    JEL classification:

    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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