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Exploring the impact of R&D and climate change on agricultural productivity growth: the case of Western Australia

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  • Salim, Ruhul A.
  • Islam, Nazrul

Abstract

This article empirically examines the impact of R&D and climate change on the Western Australian Agricultural sector using standard time series econometrics. Based on historical data for the period of 1977–2005, the empirical results show that both R&D and climate change matter for long-run productivity growth. The long-run elasticity of total factor productivity (TFP) with respect to R&D expenditure is 0.497, while that of climate change is 0.506. There is a unidirectional causality running from R&D expenditure to TFP growth in both the short run and long run. Further, the variance decomposition and impulse response function confirm that a significant portion of output and productivity growth beyond the sample period is explained by R&D expenditure. These results justify the increase in R&D investment in the deteriorating climatic condition in the agricultural sector to improve the long-run prospects of productivity growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Salim, Ruhul A. & Islam, Nazrul, 2010. "Exploring the impact of R&D and climate change on agricultural productivity growth: the case of Western Australia," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 54(4), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:162054
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    Cited by:

    1. Khan, Farid & Salim, Ruhul, 2015. "The Public R&D and Productivity Growth in Australian Broadacre Agriculture: A Cointegration and Causality Approach," 2015 Conference (59th), February 10-13, 2015, Rotorua, New Zealand 204432, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    2. repec:eee:ecanpo:v:54:y:2017:i:c:p:96-104 is not listed on IDEAS

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