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Mobility under the COVID-19 Pandemic: Asymmetric Effects across Gender and Age

Author

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  • Caselli, Francesca
  • Grigoli, Francesco
  • Sandri, Damiano
  • Spilimbergo, Antonio

Abstract

Overall mobility declined during the COVID-19 pandemic because of government lockdowns and voluntary social distancing. Yet, aggregate data mask important heterogeneous effects across segments of the population. Using unique mobility indicators based on anonymized and aggregate data provided by Vodafone for Italy, Portugal, and Spain, we find that lockdowns had a larger impact on the mobility of women and younger cohorts. Younger people also experienced a sharper drop in mobility in response to rising COVID-19 infections. Our findings, which are consistent across estimation methods and robust to a variety of tests, warn about a possible widening of gender and inter-generational inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Caselli, Francesca & Grigoli, Francesco & Sandri, Damiano & Spilimbergo, Antonio, 2021. "Mobility under the COVID-19 Pandemic: Asymmetric Effects across Gender and Age," GLO Discussion Paper Series 753, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:753
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aum, Sangmin & Lee, Sang Yoon (Tim) & Shin, Yongseok, 2021. "COVID-19 doesn’t need lockdowns to destroy jobs: The effect of local outbreaks in Korea," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C).
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    6. Belot, Michèle & Choi, Syngjoo & Tripodi, Egon & van den Broek-Altenburg, Eline & Jamison, Julian C. & Papageorge, Nicholas W., 2020. "Unequal Consequences of COVID-19 across Age and Income: Representative Evidence from Six Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 13366, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Tsutomu Watanabe & Tomoyoshi Yabu, 2021. "Japan’s voluntary lockdown: further evidence based on age-specific mobile location data," The Japanese Economic Review, Springer, vol. 72(3), pages 333-370, July.
    2. Tsutomu Watanabe & Tomoyoshi Yabu, 2021. "Japan’s Voluntary Lockdown: Further Evidence Based on Age-Specific Mobile Location Data," Working Papers on Central Bank Communication 029, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    COVID-19; lockdown; mobility; gender; age;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E1 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • H0 - Public Economics - - General

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