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The size and determinants of fiscal multipliers in Western Balkans: comparing Croatia, Slovenia and Serbia

Author

Listed:
  • Milan Deskar Škrbić

    (Erste & Steiermarkische bank)

  • Hrvoje Šimović

    (Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb)

Abstract

When estimating the size of fiscal multipliers one has to take into consideration various structural characteristics of economies which, directly or indirectly, affect the transmission from government stimuli to economic activity. Thus, in this paper we use a ‘bucket approach’ to determination of the size of fiscal multipliers, which enables us to make presumptions on the size of fiscal multipliers, given the structural characteristics of selected Western Balkan economies – Croatia, Slovenia and Serbia. After this ‘non-empirical’ approach we use structural VAR framework to test our hypothesis derived from the ‘bucket approach’. Our results confirmed the hypotheses on the relative size of the multipliers between these three peer countries, with Croatia having the highest spending multiplier and Slovenia the lowest one.

Suggested Citation

  • Milan Deskar Škrbić & Hrvoje Šimović, 2015. "The size and determinants of fiscal multipliers in Western Balkans: comparing Croatia, Slovenia and Serbia," EFZG Working Papers Series 1510, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Zagreb.
  • Handle: RePEc:zag:wpaper:1510
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. World Bank, 2020. "Serbia’s New Growth Agenda," World Bank Other Operational Studies 33565, The World Bank.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fiscal multipliers; Western Balkans; bucket approach; structural VAR;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • H30 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - General
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General

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