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Government Purchases Reloaded : Informational Insufficiency and Heterogeneity in Fiscal VARs

Author

Listed:
  • Ellahie, Atif

    (David Eccles School of Business, University of Utah)

  • Ricco, Giovanni

    (Department of Economics, The University of Warwick)

Abstract

Using a large Bayesian VAR, we approximate the flow of information received by economic agents to investigate the effects of changes to government purchases. We document robust evidence that informational insufficiency in conventional models explains inconsistent results across samples and commonly employed identifications in recursive Structural VARs and Expectational VARs. Furthermore, we report heterogeneous effects of components of government purchases. While aggregate government purchases do not appear to produce strong stimulative effects with output multiplier around 0.7, government investment components have multipliers well above unity. State and local consumption, which captures investment in education and health, elicits a strong response.

Suggested Citation

  • Ellahie, Atif & Ricco, Giovanni, 2017. "Government Purchases Reloaded : Informational Insufficiency and Heterogeneity in Fiscal VARs," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1138, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wrk:warwec:1138
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fiscal shocks ; government purchases ; fiscal foresight ; Large Bayesian; VARs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy; Modern Monetary Theory

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