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Sorting and inequality in Canadian schools

Author

Listed:
  • Jane Friesen

    (Simon Fraser University)

  • Brian Krauth

    (Simon Fraser University)

Abstract

Researchers and educators often argue that a student's peers strongly influence his or her educational outcomes. If so, an unequal distribution of advantaged and disadvantaged students across schools in a community will leave many students doubly disadvantaged and amplify existing inequalities. We explore the relationship between the degree of sorting by socioeconomic characteristics, ethnicity and language across schools within a community and inequality as measured by the variance of standardized high school exam scores within the community. Simple cross- sectional estimates suggest a direct relationship between sorting by ethnicity and the variance of test scores, but no direct relationship between sorting by income or primary parent's education and the variance of test scores. We then implement a fixed effects estimator to control for endogeneity in the extent of sorting: the results indicate that sorting by ethnicity does not affect the variance of test scores, but that sorting by home language and primary parent's education does.

Suggested Citation

  • Jane Friesen & Brian Krauth, 2004. "Sorting and inequality in Canadian schools," HEW 0408001, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwphe:0408001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Robert Bifulco & Jason M. Fletcher & Stephen L. Ross, 2011. "The Effect of Classmate Characteristics on Post-secondary Outcomes: Evidence from the Add Health," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 25-53, February.
    2. Murguia Baysse, Juan Manuel, 2013. "Essays on agricultural, financial economics and education," ISU General Staff Papers 201301010800004458, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Simon Burgess & Deborah Wilson & Adam Briggs & Anete Piebalga, 2008. "Segregation and the Attainment of Minority Ethnic Pupils in England," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/204, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    4. Matilde Bombardini & Giovanni Gallipoli & German Pupato, 2012. "Skill Dispersion and Trade Flows," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 2327-2348, August.
    5. Simone Celant, 2013. "The analysis of students’ academic achievement: the evaluation of peer effects through relational links," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 615-631, February.
    6. Robert Bifulco & Jason Fletcher & Stephen Ross, 2008. "The Effect of Classmate Characteristics on Individual Outcomes: Evidence from the Add Health," Working papers 2008-21, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2009.
    7. Claudia Olivetti & Eleonora Patacchini & Yves Zenou, 2016. "Mothers, Peers and Gender Identity," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 904, Boston College Department of Economics.
    8. Diana Mok & Ling‐Hin Li, 2010. "The Spatial Impact of Language Policies on the Marginal Bids for English Education in Hong Kong," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(4), pages 556-587, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    social interactions; peer effects; sorting; classroom effects;

    JEL classification:

    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare

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