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Diet quality, child health, and food policies in developing countries

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  • Bhargava, Alok

Abstract

Although the importance of diet quality for improving child health is widely recognized, the roles of environmental factors and the absorption of nutrients for children's physical growth and morbidity have not been adequately integrated into a policy framework. Moreover, nutrient intakes gradually affect child health, so it is helpful to use alternative tools to evaluate short-term interventions versus long-term food policies. This article emphasizes the role of diet quality reflected in the intake of nutrients such as protein, calcium, and iron for children's physical growth. Vitamins A and C are important for reducing morbidity. Children's growth and morbidity affect their cognitive development, which is critical for the future supply of skilled labor and economic growth. Evidence on these issues from countries such as Bangladesh, India, Kenya, the Philippines, and Tanzania is summarized. The supply of nutritious foods is appraised from the viewpoint of improving diet quality. Finally, the roles of educational campaigns and indirect taxes on unhealthy processed foods consumed by the affluent in developing countries are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Bhargava, Alok, 2014. "Diet quality, child health, and food policies in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7072, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7072
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:10:y:2018:i:6:d:10.1007_s12571-018-0858-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mousumi Das & Ajay Sharma & Suresh Chandra Babu, 2018. "Pathways from agriculture-to-nutrition in India: implications for sustainable development goals," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(6), pages 1561-1576, December.
    3. Niti Aayog GOI, 2017. "Evaluation Study on Role of Public Distribution System in Shaping Household and Nutritional Security India," Working Papers id:11753, eSocialSciences.

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    Keywords

    Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Food&Beverage Industry; Nutrition; Early Child and Children's Health; Population Policies;

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