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Calorie Elasticities with Income Dynamics: Evidence from the Literature

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  • Zhou, De
  • Yu, Xiaohua

Abstract

This paper proposes a finite mixture model (FMM) to model the behavioral transition of calorie consumption with an assumption that nutrition consumption is a mixture of two different behavioral stages: a poor stage and an affluent stage. Based on 387 calorie-income elasticities collected from 90 primary studies, our results identify that the threshold income for calorie demand transition is 459.8 USD in 2012 prices (PPP). It implies that the transitional threshold for calorie consumption is 1.26 dollar/day, which is slightly lower than the World Bank poverty line (1.25 dollar/day in 2005 PPP prices).

Suggested Citation

  • Zhou, De & Yu, Xiaohua, 2014. "Calorie Elasticities with Income Dynamics: Evidence from the Literature," Discussion Papers 168529, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:gagfdp:168529
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    Cited by:

    1. Santeramo, Fabio Gaetano & Carlucci, Domenico & De Devitiis, Biagia & Seccia, Antonio & Stasi, Antonio & Viscecchia, Rosaria & Nardone, Gianluca, 2017. "Emerging trends in European food, diets and food industry," MPRA Paper 82105, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Arsham Reisinezhad, 2018. "Economic Growth and Income Inequality in Resource Countries: Theory and Evidence," PSE Working Papers halshs-01707976, HAL.
    3. Melo, P. C. & Abdul-Salam, Yakubu & Roberts, D. & Colen, L. & Mary, S. & Gomez Y Paloma, S., 2016. "Income growth and malnutrition in Africa: Is there a need for region-specific policies?," 90th Annual Conference, April 4-6, 2016, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 236372, Agricultural Economics Society.
    4. Santeramo, Fabio Gaetano & Shabnam, Nadia, 2015. "The income-elasticity of calories, macro and micro nutrients: What is the literature telling us?," MPRA Paper 63754, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. François Gardes & Noël Thiombiano, 2017. "The value of time and expenditures of rural households in Burkina Faso: a domestic production framework," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01535172, HAL.
    6. Patricia C Melo & Yakubu Abdul-Salam & Deborah Roberts & Alana Gilbert & Robin Matthews & Liesbeth Colen & Sergio Gomez Y Paloma, 2015. "Income Elasticities of Food Demand in Africa: A Meta-Analysis," JRC Working Papers JRC98812, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    7. François Gardes & Noël Thiombiano, 2017. "The value of time and expenditures of rural households in Burkina Faso: a domestic production framework," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 17027, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    8. Xiaohua Yu & Satoru Shimokawa, 2016. "Nutritional impacts of rising food prices in African countries: a review," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(5), pages 985-997, October.
    9. Tian, Xu & Yu, Xiaohua, 2015. "Using semiparametric models to study nutrition improvement and dietary change with different indices: The case of China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 67-81.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    nutrition transition; calorie consumption; income elasticity; finite mixture model; Agricultural and Food Policy; Demand and Price Analysis; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Food Security and Poverty; D12;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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