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Income Elasticities of Food Demand in Africa: A Meta-Analysis

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In order to combat malnutrition, economists and policymakers need to understand how food demand will change, as the continent further develops. Especially, a better understanding of, first, the factors underlying the relation between income and food demand, and, second, how this relation is changing according to the income level and/or characteristics of the country under study, may help improve the design and implementation of nutrition policies. There are a number of studies that have estimated the relation between income growth and food demand in Africa, but the resulting estimates are highly heterogeneous. This report provides a systematic review of the existing literature on income elasticities of food demand in Africa. Using a meta-analysis approach, this report identifies the factors determining the relation between food demand and income. Further research could usefully explore in greater detail some of the patterns identified and, in doing so, contribute to the design of policies aimed at addressing malnutrition.

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File URL: http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC98812
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Paper provided by Joint Research Centre (Seville site) in its series JRC Working Papers with number JRC98812.

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Length: 74 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2015
Handle: RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc98812
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