IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fpr/ifprid/1695.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Animal sourced foods and child stunting:

Author

Listed:
  • Headey, Derek D.
  • Hirvonen, Kalle
  • Hoddinott, John F.

Abstract

Stunting affects 160 million pre-school children around the world, and imposes significant costs on a child’s health, cognitive development, schooling and economic performance. Stunting in early childhood has been linked to poor dietary diversity, notably low intake of animal-sourced foods (ASFs) rich in high quality protein and other growth-stimulating nutrients. Surprisingly, however, very little economic research has focused on ASFs and child growth. In this paper we redress this omission through an analysis of 112,553 children aged 6-23 months from 46 countries. We first document distinctive patterns of ASF consumption among children in different regions, particularly highly variable patterns of dairy consumption, low consumption of eggs and meat, and surprisingly frequent consumption of fish in several poor regions of Africa and Asia. We then examine how ASF consumption is associated with child stunting in multivariate models saturated with control variables.

Suggested Citation

  • Headey, Derek D. & Hirvonen, Kalle & Hoddinott, John F., 2017. "Animal sourced foods and child stunting:," IFPRI discussion papers 1695, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1695
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cdm15738.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getfile/collection/p15738coll2/id/132232/filename/132446.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Moradi, Alexander & Baten, Joerg, 2005. "Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa: New Data and New Insights from Anthropometric Estimates," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1233-1265, August.
    2. Subramanian, Shankar & Deaton, Angus, 1996. "The Demand for Food and Calories," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(1), pages 133-162, February.
    3. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:77:y:2018:i:c:p:116-132 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Headey, Derek D. & Hirvonen, Kalle, 2015. "Exploring child health risks of poultry keeping in Ethiopia: Insights from the 2015 Feed the Future Survey," ESSP research notes 43, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Grasgruber, P. & Sebera, M. & Hrazdíra, E. & Cacek, J. & Kalina, T., 2016. "Major correlates of male height: A study of 105 countries," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 172-195.
    6. Robert J. Gordon, 2016. "Perspectives on The Rise and Fall of American Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 72-76, May.
    7. Per Pinstrup-Andersen & Elizabeth Caicedo, 1978. "The Potential Impact of Changes in Income Distribution on Food Demand and Human Nutrition," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 60(3), pages 402-415.
    8. Rawlins, Rosemary & Pimkina, Svetlana & Barrett, Christopher B. & Pedersen, Sarah & Wydick, Bruce, 2014. "Got milk? The impact of Heifer International’s livestock donation programs in Rwanda on nutritional outcomes," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 202-213.
    9. Alderman, Harold & Headey, Derek D., 2017. "How Important is Parental Education for Child Nutrition?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 448-464.
    10. Lora Iannotti & Ellen Muehlhoff & Deirdre Mcmahon, 2013. "Review of milk and dairy programmes affecting nutrition," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 82-115, March.
    11. Patricia C Melo & Yakubu Abdul-Salam & Deborah Roberts & Alana Gilbert & Robin Matthews & Liesbeth Colen & Sergio Gomez Y Paloma, 2015. "Income Elasticities of Food Demand in Africa: A Meta-Analysis," JRC Working Papers JRC98812, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    12. Goodwin, Barry K. & Grennes, Thomas J. & Craig, Lee A., 2002. "Mechanical Refrigeration and the Integration of Perishable Commodity Markets," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 154-182, April.
    13. Narrod, Clare A. & Pray, Carl E. & Tiongco, Marites, 2008. "Technology transfer, policies, and the role of the private sector in the global poultry revolution:," IFPRI discussion papers 841, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. John Hoddinott & Derek Headey & Mekdim Dereje, 2015. "Cows, Missing Milk Markets, and Nutrition in Rural Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(8), pages 958-975, August.
    15. repec:aea:aecrev:v:107:y:2017:i:9:p:2600-2629 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. de Beer, Hans, 2012. "Dairy products and physical stature: A systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 299-309.
    17. Baten, Jorg & Murray, John E., 2000. "Heights of Men and Women in 19th-Century Bavaria: Economic, Nutritional, and Disease Influences," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 351-369, October.
    18. Baten, Joerg, 2009. "Protein supply and nutritional status in nineteenth century Bavaria, Prussia and France," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 165-180, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Schneider, Eric B. & Ogasawara, Kota, 2018. "Disease and child growth in industrialising Japan: Critical windows and the growth pattern, 1917–39," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 64-80.
    2. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:83:y:2019:i:c:p:170-179 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    animal products; nutrition; child nutrition; malnutrition; nutritional disorders; livestock; fisheries; agricultural policies; food policies; food consumption; developing countries; protein intake;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1695. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.