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Raising chickens for increased egg consumption in a rural highland Bolivian population

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  • Peter R. Berti

    (HealthBridge)

  • Heber Araujo Cossio

    (CENDA (El Centro de Comunicación y Desarrollo Andino))

Abstract

In highland Bolivia a three-year nutrition-sensitive agricultural intervention was carried out with rural families in which chicken rearing was promoted in order to increase egg consumption. Here we report on the impact of the intervention on participants’ diets. The non-randomized intervention took place in 21 rural communities in the province of Tapacarí in the department of Cochabamba, Bolivia. Intervention communities had staggered start times, with two communities starting in 2013, three communities starting in 2014 and sixteen communities starting in 2015. Twenty-four hour dietary recall data were collected from all individuals in 22 households in two communities in February/March 2013, 33 households in three communities in February/March 2014, and 66 households in fourteen communities in February/March 2015. We tested for changes from 2013 to 2014 to 2015 in consumption of 10 food groups in children under 6 years, adult men and adult women. By endline, egg production was established in ~80% of the intervention households. From baseline to endline egg consumption increased to approximately one-half egg/person/day: in children from 7 to 33 g/day, in women from 6 to 33 g/day, and in men from 6 to 39 g/day. Despite the increased intake in eggs, intake of most nutrients did not change. Higher egg consumption would be required to produce observable average increases in nutrient intake.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter R. Berti & Heber Araujo Cossio, 2017. "Raising chickens for increased egg consumption in a rural highland Bolivian population," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 9(6), pages 1329-1341, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0728-5
    DOI: 10.1007/s12571-017-0728-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nyantakyi-Frimpong, Hanson & Colecraft, Esi K. & Awuah, Raphael Baffour & Adjorlolo, Leonard Kofi & Wilson, Mark L. & Jones, Andrew D., 2018. "Leveraging smallholder livestock production to reduce anemia: A qualitative study of three agroecological zones in Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 212(C), pages 191-202.

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